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The Effective Temperature Scale of Galactic Red Supergiants: Cool, but Not As Cool As We Thought
We use moderate-resolution optical spectrophotometry and the new MARCSstellar atmosphere models to determine the effective temperatures of 74Galactic red supergiants (RSGs). The stars are mostly members of OBassociations or clusters with known distances, allowing a criticalcomparison with modern stellar evolutionary tracks. We find we canachieve excellent matches between the observations and the reddenedmodel fluxes and molecular transitions, although the atomic lines Ca Iλ4226 and Ca II H and K are found to be unrealistically strong inthe models. Our new effective temperature scale is significantly warmerthan those in the literature, with the differences amounting to 400 Kfor the latest type M supergiants (i.e., M5 I). We show that the newlyderived temperatures and bolometric corrections give much betteragreement with stellar evolutionary tracks. This agreement provides acompletely independent verification of our new temperature scale. Thecombination of effective temperature and bolometric luminosities allowsus to calculate stellar radii; the coolest and most luminous stars (KWSgr, Case 75, KY Cyg, HD 206936=μ Cep) have radii of roughly 1500Rsolar (7 AU), in excellent accordance with the largeststellar radii predicted from current evolutionary theory, althoughsmaller than that found by others for the binary VV Cep and for thepeculiar star VY CMa. We find that similar results are obtained for theeffective temperatures and bolometric luminosities using only thedereddened V-K colors, providing a powerful demonstration of theself-consistency of the MARCS models.

A Uniform Database of 2.2-16.5 μm Spectra from the ISOCAM CVF Spectrometer
We present all ISOCAM circular variable filter (CVF) spectra that covermore than one-third of the 2.2-16.5 μm spectral range of theinstrument. The 364 spectra have been classified according to theclassification system of Kraemer et al., as modified by Hodge et al. toaccount for the shorter wavelength range. Prior to classification, thespectra were processed and recalibrated to create a uniform database.Aperture photometry was performed at each wavelength centered on thebrightest position in each image field and the various spectral segmentsmerged into a single spectrum. The aperture was the same for all scalesizes of the images. Since this procedure differs fundamentally fromthat used in the initial ISOCAM calibration, a recalibration of thespectral response of the instrument was required for the aperturephotometry. The recalibrated spectra and the software used to createthem are available to the community on-line via the ISO Data Archive.Several new groups were added to the KSPW system to describe spectrawith no counterparts in either the SWS or PHT-S databases: CA, E/SA,UE/SA, and SSA. The zodiacal dust cloud provides the most commonbackground continuum to the spectral features, visible in almost 40% ofthe processed sources. The most characteristic and ubiquitous spectralfeatures observed in the CVF spectral atlas are those of theunidentified infrared bands (UIR), which are typically attributed toultraviolet-excited fluorescence of large molecules containing aromatichydrocarbons. The UIR features commonly occur superimposed on thezodiacal background (18%) but can also appear in conjunction with otherspectral features, such as fine-structure emission lines or silicateabsorption. In at least 13 of the galaxies observed, the pattern of UIRemission features has been noticeably shifted to longer wavelengths.Based on observations with the Infrared Space Observatory, a EuropeanSpace Agency (ESA) project with instruments funded by ESA Member States(especially the Principal Investigator countries: France, Germany, theNetherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of theInstitute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) and the NationalAeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

High-Resolution Imaging of Dust Shells by Using Keck Aperture Masking and the IOTA Interferometer
We present first results of an experiment to combine data from Keckaperture masking and the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array to image thecircumstellar environments of evolved stars with ~20 mas resolution. Theunique combination of excellent Fourier coverage at short baselines andhigh-quality long-baseline fringe data allows us to determine thelocation and clumpiness of the innermost hot dust in the envelopes andto measure the diameters of the underlying stars themselves. We findevidence for large-scale inhomogeneities in some dust shells and alsosignificant deviations from uniform brightness for the photospheres ofthe most evolved M stars. Deviations from spherically symmetric massloss in the red supergiant NML Cyg could be related to recent evidencefor dynamically important magnetic fields and/or stellar rotation. Wepoint out that dust shell asymmetries, like those observed here, canqualitatively explain the difficulty recent workers have had insimultaneously fitting the broadband spectral energy distributions andhigh-resolution spatial information, without invoking unusual dustproperties or multiple distinct shells (from hypothetical``superwinds''). This paper is the first to combine opticalinterferometry data from multiple facilities for imaging, and we discussthe challenges and potential for the future of this method, givencurrent calibration and software limitations.

The Evolution of Massive Stars. I. Red Supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds
We investigate the red supergiant (RSG) content of the SMC and LMC usingmultiobject spectroscopy on a sample of red stars previously identifiedby BVR CCD photometry. We obtained high-accuracy (<1 kms-1) radial velocities for 118 red stars seen toward the SMCand 167 red stars seen toward the LMC, confirming most of these (89% and95%, respectively) as red supergiants. Spectral types were alsodetermined for most of these RSGs. We find that the distribution ofspectral types is skewed toward earlier type at lower metallicities: theaverage (median) spectral type is K5-K7 I in the SMC, M1 I in the LMC,and M2 I in the Milky Way. Our examination of the Kurucz ATLAS9 modelatmospheres suggests that the effect that metallicity has on theappearance on the TiO lines is probably sufficient to account for thiseffect, and we argue that RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds are 100 K (LMC)and 300 K (SMC) cooler than Galactic stars of the same spectral types.The colors of the Kurucz models are not consistent with thisinterpretation for the SMC, although other models (e.g., Bessell et al.)show good agreement. A finer grid of higher resolution synthetic spectraappropriate to cool supergiants is needed to better determine theeffective temperature scale. We compare the distribution of RSGs in theH-R diagram to that of various stellar evolutionary models; we find thatnone of the models produce RSGs as cool and luminous as what is actuallyobserved. This result is much larger than any uncertainty in theeffective temperature scale. We note that, were we to simply adopt theuncorrected Galactic effective scale for RSGs and apply this to oursample, then the SMC's RSGs would be underluminous compared with theLMC's, contrary to what we expect from stellar evolution considerations.In all of our H-R diagrams, however, there is an elegant sequence ofdecreasing effective temperatures with increasing luminosities;explaining this will be an important test of future stellar evolutionarymodels. Finally, we compute the blue-to-red supergiant ratio in the SMCand LMC, finding that the values are indistinguishable (~15) for the twoClouds. We emphasize that ``observed'' B/R values must be carefullydetermined if a comparison with that predicted by stellar models is tobe meaningful. The nonrotation Geneva models overestimate the number ofblue to red supergiants for the SMC, but underestimate it for the LMC;however, given the inability to produce high-luminosity RSGs in themodels that match what is observed in the H-R diagram, such adisagreement is not surprising.

On the Wilson-Bappu relationship in the Mg II k line
An investigation is carried out on the Wilson-Bappu effect in the Mg Iik line at 2796.34 Å. The work is based on a selection of 230 starsobserved by both the IUE and HIPPARCOS satellites, covering a wide rangeof spectral types (F to M) and absolute visual magnitudes (-5.4<=MV <=9.0). A semi-automatic procedure is used to measurethe line widths, which applies also in the presence of strong centralabsorption reversal. The Wilson-Bappu relationship here provided isconsidered to represent an improvement over previous recent results forthe considerably larger data sample used, as well as for a properconsideration of the measurement errors. No evidence has been found fora possible dependence of the WB effect on stellar metallicity andeffective temperature.

Catalogue of Apparent Diameters and Absolute Radii of Stars (CADARS) - Third edition - Comments and statistics
The Catalogue, available at the Centre de Données Stellaires deStrasbourg, consists of 13 573 records concerning the results obtainedfrom different methods for 7778 stars, reported in the literature. Thefollowing data are listed for each star: identifications, apparentmagnitude, spectral type, apparent diameter in arcsec, absolute radiusin solar units, method of determination, reference, remarks. Commentsand statistics obtained from CADARS are given. The Catalogue isavailable in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcar?J/A+A/367/521

The proper motions of fundamental stars. I. 1535 stars from the Basic FK5
A direct combination of the positions given in the HIPPARCOS cataloguewith astrometric ground-based catalogues having epochs later than 1939allows us to obtain new proper motions for the 1535 stars of the BasicFK5. The results are presented as the catalogue Proper Motions ofFundamental Stars (PMFS), Part I. The median precision of the propermotions is 0.5 mas/year for mu alpha cos delta and 0.7mas/year for mu delta . The non-linear motions of thephotocentres of a few hundred astrometric binaries are separated intotheir linear and elliptic motions. Since the PMFS proper motions do notinclude the information given by the proper motions from othercatalogues (HIPPARCOS, FK5, FK6, etc.) this catalogue can be used as anindependent source of the proper motions of the fundamental stars.Catalogue (Table 3) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strastg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/365/222

Modeling the Variable Chromosphere of α Orionis
A spectral analysis of the prototypical red supergiant star α Orithat is based on near-UV, optical, and near-IR high-dispersion spectraobtained between 1992 September and 1999 July with the Space TelescopeImaging Spectrograph and the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on theHubble Space Telescope, the Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph, and the SoFinEchelle Spectrograph is presented. With detailed non-LTE radiativetransfer calculations in spherical geometry, we model the meanconditions in the stellar chromosphere from Hα and the Mg IIresonance doublet. The Hα absorption line emerges from an extendedchromosphere. Temporal changes of its velocity structure are determinedfrom detailed fits to near-UV Si I lines, and chromospheric expansionvelocities around 4 km s -1 are found in 1992, whereas thechromosphere was collapsing onto the photosphere with a velocity of 5 kms -1 in 1998-1999. The Hα core depth is correlated overtime with weaker depression changes seen in prominent TiO band headsthat dominate the optical spectrum. From elaborate spectral synthesiscalculations, we isolate unblended metal absorption lines in the near-IRand determine Teff=3500 K and log(g)=-0.5 for solarmetallicity and 12+/-0.5 km s -1 for macrobroadening andvsini. Semiempirical fits yield chromospheric temperatures not in excessof 5500 K, but with long-term changes by ~400 K. The model extends over5000 Rsolar and requires supersonic microturbulence valuesranging to 19 km s -1, in strong contrast with thephotospheric value of only 2 km s -1. We observe Dopplershifts of 4-8 km s -1 in the scattering cores of manydouble-peaked near-UV emission lines which correlate with changes in theintensity ratio of their emission components. The red emissioncomponents were much stronger in 1992, indicating a phase of enhancedchromospheric outflow, for which we determine a spherical mass-loss rateof 6×10-7 Msolar yr -1. Wepresent a discussion of chromospheric pulsation in this massive star.Detailed modeling of the observed Mg II h and k line asymmetry is alsopresented. We demonstrate that a chromospheric Mn I blend stronglycontributes to this puzzling asymmetry. Based in part on observationswith the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space TelescopeScience Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contractNAS 5-26555.

Observational investigation of mass loss of M supergiants
We present the analysis of infrared photometry and millimeterspectroscopy of a sample of 74 late-type supergiants. These observationsare particularly suitable to study the mass loss and the circumstellarenvelopes of evolved massive stars. In particular, we quantify thecircumstellar infrared excess, the relation of mass loss with stellarproperties, using the K-[12] colour index as mass-loss indicator. We donot find any clear correlation between mass loss rate and luminosity. Wealso show that the K-band magnitude is a simple luminosity indicator,because of the relative constancy of the K-band bolometric correction.Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, LaSilla, Chile within program ESO 54.E-0914, and on observations collectedwith the IRAM 30m telescope. Tables A1 to A3 are only available inelectronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

The Abundance of Interstellar Tin and Cadmium
We have determined the gas-phase interstellar abundance of the dominantions of tin and cadmium (Sn II and Cd II) in the diffuse clouds toward14 and 5 stars, respectively. Our measurements show that tin isexchanged between the gas and dust phases of the diffuse interstellarmedium, while cadmium is not. The sight lines showing the highestgas-phase tin-to-hydrogen ratios (the least amount of Sn depletion) havevalues of Sn/H that are supersolar. Tin is the first element to show awell-determined interstellar gas-phase abundance that appears to beenriched with respect to the Sun. This finding is direct evidence ofs-process enrichment of the ISM by low- to intermediate-mass asymptoticgiant branch stars. The average Cd/H abundance ratio in our sample is0.09 dex below the Sun's. This ratio does not preclude an enhancement ofcadmium with respect to the Sun if Cd is incorporated into dust and/orif the adopted f-value for the cadmium transition has a large error.

A HIPPARCOS Census of the Nearby OB Associations
A comprehensive census of the stellar content of the OB associationswithin 1 kpc from the Sun is presented, based on Hipparcos positions,proper motions, and parallaxes. It is a key part of a long-term projectto study the formation, structure, and evolution of nearby young stellargroups and related star-forming regions. OB associations are unbound``moving groups,'' which can be detected kinematically because of theirsmall internal velocity dispersion. The nearby associations have a largeextent on the sky, which traditionally has limited astrometricmembership determination to bright stars (V<~6 mag), with spectraltypes earlier than ~B5. The Hipparcos measurements allow a majorimprovement in this situation. Moving groups are identified in theHipparcos Catalog by combining de Bruijne's refurbished convergent pointmethod with the ``Spaghetti method'' of Hoogerwerf & Aguilar.Astrometric members are listed for 12 young stellar groups, out to adistance of ~650 pc. These are the three subgroups Upper Scorpius, UpperCentaurus Lupus, and Lower Centaurus Crux of Sco OB2, as well as VelOB2, Tr 10, Col 121, Per OB2, alpha Persei (Per OB3), Cas-Tau, Lac OB1,Cep OB2, and a new group in Cepheus, designated as Cep OB6. Theselection procedure corrects the list of previously known astrometricand photometric B- and A-type members in these groups and identifiesmany new members, including a significant number of F stars, as well asevolved stars, e.g., the Wolf-Rayet stars gamma^2 Vel (WR 11) in Vel OB2and EZ CMa (WR 6) in Col 121, and the classical Cepheid delta Cep in CepOB6. Membership probabilities are given for all selected stars. MonteCarlo simulations are used to estimate the expected number of interloperfield stars. In the nearest associations, notably in Sco OB2, thelater-type members include T Tauri objects and other stars in the finalpre-main-sequence phase. This provides a firm link between the classicalhigh-mass stellar content and ongoing low-mass star formation. Detailedstudies of these 12 groups, and their relation to the surroundinginterstellar medium, will be presented elsewhere. Astrometric evidencefor moving groups in the fields of R CrA, CMa OB1, Mon OB1, Ori OB1, CamOB1, Cep OB3, Cep OB4, Cyg OB4, Cyg OB7, and Sct OB2, is inconclusive.OB associations do exist in many of these regions, but they are eitherat distances beyond ~500 pc where the Hipparcos parallaxes are oflimited use, or they have unfavorable kinematics, so that the groupproper motion does not distinguish it from the field stars in theGalactic disk. The mean distances of the well-established groups aresystematically smaller than the pre-Hipparcos photometric estimates.While part of this may be caused by the improved membership lists, arecalibration of the upper main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russelldiagram may be called for. The mean motions display a systematicpattern, which is discussed in relation to the Gould Belt. Six of the 12detected moving groups do not appear in the classical list of nearby OBassociations. This is sometimes caused by the absence of O stars, but inother cases a previously known open cluster turns out to be (part of) anextended OB association. The number of unbound young stellar groups inthe solar neighborhood may be significantly larger than thoughtpreviously.

Lithium abundance and mass
Observations of cool giants have shown that there exists a large rangein their lithium abundances even for apparently similar stars. Thedepletions are large in a majority of them, far in excess of thepredictions of the standard stellar evolution models. In order toexplore whether the large spread in Li abundances observed in giants canbe interpreted in terms of mass, moderately high resolution CCD spectraof the Li I line at 6707.8 Ä have been obtained in 65 subgiants,giants and supergiants and the lithium abundances derived. Theirabsolute magnitudes have been estimated from the Hipparcos data.Absolute magnitudes have also been determined for another 802 starswhose lithium abundances are already known from the availableliterature. All these stars have been plotted on the HR diagram andcompared with the theoretical evolutionary tracks of Bressan et al.(1993) with initial masses ranging from 1 M_sun to 9 M_sun for achemical composition typical of the solar neighbourhood: X=0.70, Y=0.28,Z=0.02. The stars of low mass of this sample, (<2M_sun), span a widerange in evolution (unmixed warm subgiants and mixed giants) andtherefore, show a correspondingly wide range of Li abundances, perhapsreminiscent of the large range in abundances observed on the mainsequence. The spread is further augmented by the effects of increasingdilution and mixing as the stars evolve to the right and up the redgiant branch. Higher mass stars show a different behaviour. Many of thegiants of masses between 2.5 and 4.0 M_sun observed in the present studyhave Li abundances close to what is predicted by the standard stellarmodels. On the other hand, there are several high mass giants (>2.5M_sun) cooler than Teff = 5000 K with Li abundances as low asthose of low mass stars of similar effective temperature. There must beparameters other than mass and evolutionary status, as implied by thestandard evolution model of a star, that control its Li abundance.

The central depth of the Ca II triplet lines as a discriminant of chromospheric activity in late type stars
Not Available

The Infrared Spectral Classification of Oxygen-rich Dust Shells
This paper presents infrared spectral classifications for a flux-limitedsample of 635 optically identified oxygen-rich variables includingsupergiants and sources on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Severalclasses of spectra from oxygen-rich dust exist, and these can bearranged in a smoothly varying sequence of spectral shapes known as thesilicate dust sequence. Classification based on this sequence revealsseveral dependencies of the dust emission on the properties of thecentral star. Nearly all S stars show broad emission features fromalumina dust, while most of the supergiants exhibit classic featuresfrom amorphous silicate dust. Mira variables with symmetric light curvesgenerally show broad alumina emission, while those with more asymmetriclight curves show classic silicate emission. These differences may arisefrom differences in the photospheric C/O ratio.

Chromospheric activity in cool stars and the lithium abundance
A detailed analysis of the Ca II triplet lines lkern -4.1ptlower2ptchar19 kern -0.8ptambdalkern -4.1ptlower2pt char19 kern -0.8ptambda8498,8542, 8662 in 146 cool stars of all luminosities spanning a large rangein metallicity has revealed that stars with similar temperature,luminosity and metallicity have different Ca II central depths due todifferent degrees of their chromospheric activity. Based on this idea,14 stars in the sample have been identified as chromospherically moreactive than their counterparts with similar values of atmosphericparameters. In order to explore the interdependence betweenchromospheric activity, age and lithium abundance, CCD echelle spectraof the Li I line at 6707.8 Angstroms have been obtained at a spectralresolution of 0.35 Angstroms in these 14 active stars, 18 relativelyinactive stars and another 17 stars randomly selected from the abovesample. The analysis shows that although a few of the active stars areLi-rich, there does not exist a one-to-one correlation between Liabundance and chromospheric activity. There is almost an equal number ofinactive stars which are Li rich. Otherwise, lithium depletions arelarge and there is a large spread in Li abundances in both active andinactive stars especially among giants and supergiants. For most ofthem, the abundance log N(Li) lies roughly between -0.3 to +0.7. Asimilar large range in Li abundances is found for giants not selected onthe basis of chromospheric activity. The above observations suggestthere are parameters besides the activity related ones controlling thelithium abundance in these stars.

The Tokyo PMC catalog 90-93: Catalog of positions of 6649 stars observed in 1990 through 1993 with Tokyo photoelectric meridian circle
The sixth annual catalog of the Tokyo Photoelectric Meridian Circle(PMC) is presented for 6649 stars which were observed at least two timesin January 1990 through March 1993. The mean positions of the starsobserved are given in the catalog at the corresponding mean epochs ofobservations of individual stars. The coordinates of the catalog arebased on the FK5 system, and referred to the equinox and equator ofJ2000.0. The mean local deviations of the observed positions from theFK5 catalog positions are constructed for the basic FK5 stars to comparewith those of the Tokyo PMC Catalog 89 and preliminary Hipparcos resultsof H30.

Quantitative spectral classification of galactic disc K-M stars from spectrophotometric measurements
New spectral observations for 47 southern galactic red supergiantsobtained with the new RUBIKON spectrophotometer (developed at theAstronomisches Institut der Ruhr-Universitat Bochum) at the Bochum 61-cmtelescope on La Silla are presented. The spectra range from 4800 to 7700A and their resolution is 10 A. The mean error of absolute fluxes is0.028 mag and that of relative fluxes 0.021 mag. The spectra will beavailable at the Strasbourg Stellar Database (CDS). Together with datataken from recently published spectral catalogues, the new observationshave been used to define spectral indices as measures of the strengthsof the following features: Fe i+TiOalpha_1, Mgb+TiOalpha_0,NaD+TiOgamma'_1, TiOgamma'_0 and TiOgamma_1 systems. The indices havebeen checked against errors introduced by reductions, interstellarreddening and different resolutions of different spectral catalogues,and have been found to be very insensitive to all these effects.Therefore, different catalogues may be combined without any loss ofaccuracy and homogeneity. The mean error of a single index has beenfound to be 0.011 mag. For stars from K4 to M7, a strong temperaturedependence is found for all indices. For the Fe i+TiO and especially theMgb+TiO features, a strong dependence on luminosity has also beenobserved. These indices therefore have been combined to form aluminosity index, while the others together form a spectral index. Thecombined indices have been calibrated in terms of MK data using thestepwise linear regression technique, and may be used for quantitativetwo- dimensional spectral classification of late K- and M-type stars.The mean error of the classification is 0.6 of spectral subtype and 0.8of luminosity class, which is much higher than would be expected fromthe uncertainty of the indices alone (which, e.g., for an M4 giantcorrespond to an uncertainty of 0.1 of spectral subtype and 0.3 ofluminosity class). This may be explained by the uncertainty of theoriginal MK classifications and the variability of some programme stars.

Classification and Identification of IRAS Sources with Low-Resolution Spectra
IRAS low-resolution spectra were extracted for 11,224 IRAS sources.These spectra were classified into astrophysical classes, based on thepresence of emission and absorption features and on the shape of thecontinuum. Counterparts of these IRAS sources in existing optical andinfrared catalogs are identified, and their optical spectral types arelisted if they are known. The correlations between thephotospheric/optical and circumstellar/infrared classification arediscussed.

Systematic Errors in the FK5 Catalog as Derived from CCD Observations in the Extragalactic Reference Frame.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1997AJ....114..850S&db_key=AST

An Atlas of the infrared spectral region. II. The late-type stars (G - M)
This Atlas illustrates the behavior of late type stars (F, G, K and M)in the near infrared 8400-8800 Angstrom region with a resolution ofabout 2 degrees. Seventeen figures illustrate the spectral sequence andluminosity classes V, III, Ib and Ia. Four figures illustrate peculiarspectra, namely those of Am stars, composites, weak metal stars and Sand C type objects. The complete Atlas is also available as FITS filesfrom the CDS de Strasbourg and other data centers.

Detection of red supergiant stars on the colour-colour diagrams in the system UBVRI.
Not Available

The Pulkovo Spectrophotometric Catalog of Bright Stars in the Range from 320 TO 1080 NM
A spectrophotometric catalog is presented, combining results of numerousobservations made by Pulkovo astronomers at different observing sites.The catalog consists of three parts: the first contains the data for 602stars in the spectral range of 320--735 nm with a resolution of 5 nm,the second one contains 285 stars in the spectral range of 500--1080 nmwith a resolution of 10 nm and the third one contains 278 stars combinedfrom the preceding catalogs in the spectral range of 320--1080 nm with aresolution of 10 nm. The data are presented in absolute energy unitsW/m(2) m, with a step of 2.5 nm and with an accuracy not lower than1.5--2.0%.

MG II H and K profiles in high-liminosity, late-type stars
Using high-resolution spectroscopic data taken with the Goddard HighResolution Spectrographic (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)and with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite, wecompare the profiles of the Mg II h and k lines seen in stars withspectral types ranging from early K through mid-M and luminosities fromgiants to supergiants. For all of these stars the lines are broademission features with a central absorption. When plotted on a velocityscale the absorption features of the h and k lines agree very well inboth shape and position, as do the blue wings of the emission component.The red wings of the emission, however, show a pronounced difference,with the k line wing consistently shifted to the red of the h line wing.At present the reason for this discrepancy is unknown, but we suggestseveral possibilities, including radiative transfer effects andhigh-speed stellar winds.

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

SANTIAGO 91, a right ascension catalogue of 3387 stars (equinox J2000).
The positions in right ascension of 3387 stars belonging to the Santiago67 Catalogue, observed with the Repsold Meridian Circle at Cerro Calan,National Astronomical Observatory, during the period 1989 to 1994, aregiven. The average mean square error of a position, for the wholeCatalogue, is +/-0.009 s. The mean epoch of the catalogue is 1991.84.

Radio continuum emission from stars: a catalogue update.
An updated version of my catalogue of radio stars is presented. Somestatistics and availability are discussed.

The position corrections of 1400 stars observed with PA II in San Juan.
Not Available

An atlas of southern MK standards from 5800 to 10200 A
An atlas of stellar spectra covering the wavelength range from 5800 to10,200 A is presented of 126 southern MK standard stars, covering theluminosity classes I, III, and V. Some peculiar stars are included forcomparison purposes. The spectra were obtained at a resolution of 4.3 Aper pixel using a Cassegrain-mounted Boller and Chivens spectrographequipped with a Reticon detector. The quality and utility of the dataare discussed and examples of the spectra are presented. The atlas isavailable in digital format through the NSSDC.

Vilnius Photometric System - Part Two - the Bright Southern Standard Stars
Not Available

The second Quito astrolabe catalogue
The paper contains 515 individual corrections {DELTA}α and 235corrections {DELTA}δ to FK5 and FK5Supp. stars and 50 correctionsto their proper motions computed from observations made with theclassical Danjon astrolabe OPL-13 at Quito Astronomical Observatory ofEcuador National Polytechnical School during a period from 1964 to 1983.These corrections cover the declination zone from -30deg to +30deg. Meanprobable errors of catalogue positions are 0.047" in αcosδand 0.054" in δ. The systematic trends of the catalogue{DELTA}αalpha_cosδ,{DELTA}αdelta_cosδ,{DELTA}δalpha_, {DELTA}δdelta_ arepresented for the observed zone.

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Observation and Astrometry data

Constellation:Canis Major
Right ascension:07h01m43.10s
Declination:-27°56'05.0"
Apparent magnitude:3.47
Distance:373.134 parsecs
Proper motion RA:-6
Proper motion Dec:3.8
B-T magnitude:5.744
V-T magnitude:3.656

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names   (Edit)
Bayerσ CMa
Flamsteed22 CMa
HD 1989HD 52877
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 6531-3793-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 0600-04650213
BSC 1991HR 2646
HIPHIP 33856

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