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Mass Models for Low Surface Brightness Galaxies with High-Resolution Optical Velocity Fields
We present high-resolution optical velocity fields from DensePakintegral field spectroscopy, along with derived rotation curves, for asample of low surface brightness galaxies. In the limit of no baryons,we fit the NFW and pseudoisothermal halo models to the data and find therotation curve shapes and halo central densities to be better describedby the isothermal halo. For those galaxies with photometry, we presenthalo fits for three assumptions of the stellar mass-to-light ratio,Υ*. We find that the velocity contribution from thebaryons is significant enough in the maximum disk case that maximum diskand the NFW halo are mutually exclusive. We find a substantial cusp massexcess at the centers of the galaxies, with at least 2 times more massexpected in the cuspy CDM halo than is allowed by the data. We also findthat to reconcile the data with ΛCDM, ~20 km s-1noncircular motions are needed and/or the power spectrum has a loweramplitude on the scales that we probe.

Aperture Effects on Star Formation Rate, Metallicity, and Reddening
We use 101 galaxies selected from the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey toinvestigate the effect of aperture size on the star formation rate,metallicity, and reddening determinations for galaxies. Our sampleincludes galaxies of all Hubble types except ellipticals with globalstar formation rates (SFRs) ranging from 0.01 to 100 Msolaryr-1, metallicities in the range 7.9<~log(O/H)+12<~9.0,and reddening of 0<~A(V)<~3.3. We compare the SFR, metallicity,and reddening derived from nuclear spectra to those derived fromintegrated spectra. For apertures capturing <20% of theB26 light, the differences between nuclear and globalmetallicity, extinction, and SFR are substantial. Late-type spiralgalaxies show the largest systematic difference (~0.14 dex), withnuclear metallicities greater than the global metallicities. The Sdm,Im, and Peculiar types have the largest scatter in nuclear/integratedmetallicities, indicating a large range in metallicity gradients forthese galaxy types, or clumpy metallicity distributions. We find littleevidence for systematic differences between nuclear and globalextinction estimates for any galaxy type. However, there is significantscatter between the nuclear and integrated extinction estimates fornuclear apertures containing <20% of the B26 flux. Wecalculate an ``expected'' SFR using our nuclear spectra and apply thecommonly used aperture correction method. The expected SFR overestimatesthe global value for early-type spirals, with large scatter for allHubble types, particularly late types. The differences between theexpected and global SFRs probably result from the assumption that thedistributions of the emission-line gas and the continuum are identical.The largest scatter (error) in the estimated SFR occurs when theaperture captures <20% of the B26 emission. We discuss theimplications of these results for metallicity-luminosity relations andstar formation history studies based on fiber spectra. To reducesystematic and random errors from aperture effects, we recommendselecting samples with fibers that capture >20% of the galaxy light.For the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Two-Degree Field GalaxyRedshift Survey, redshifts z>0.04 and 0.06 are required,respectively, to ensure a covering fraction >20% for galaxy sizessimilar to the average size, type, and luminosity observed in oursample. Higher luminosity samples and samples containing many late-typegalaxies require a larger minimum redshift to ensure that >20% of thegalaxy light is enclosed by the fiber.

[O II] as a Star Formation Rate Indicator
We investigate the [O II] emission line as a star formation rate (SFR)indicator using integrated spectra of 97 galaxies from the Nearby FieldGalaxies Survey (NFGS). The sample includes all Hubble types andcontains SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 Msolaryr-1. We compare the Kennicutt [O II] and Hα SFRcalibrations and show that there are two significant effects thatproduce disagreement between SFR([O II]) and SFR(Hα): reddeningand metallicity. Differences in the ionization state of the interstellarmedium do not contribute significantly to the observed differencebetween SFR([O II]) and SFR(Hα) for the NFGS galaxies withmetallicities log(O/H)+12>~8.5. The Kennicutt [O II]-SFR relationassumes a typical reddening for nearby galaxies; in practice, thereddening differs significantly from sample to sample. We derive a newSFR([O II]) calibration that does not contain a reddening assumption.Our new SFR([O II]) calibration also provides an optional correction formetallicity. Our SFRs derived from [O II] agree with those derived fromHα to within 0.03-0.05 dex. We show that the reddening, E(B-V),increases with intrinsic (i.e., reddening-corrected) [O II] luminosityfor the NFGS sample. We apply our SFR([O II]) calibration withmetallicity correction to two samples: high-redshift 0.8

A search for Low Surface Brightness galaxies in the near-infrared. I. Selection of the sample
A sample of about 3800 Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies wasselected using the all-sky near-infrared (J, H and Ks-band)2MASS survey. The selected objects have a mean central surfacebrightness within a 5'' radius around their centre fainter than 18 magarcsec-2 in the Ks band, making them the lowestsurface brightness galaxies detected by 2MASS. A description is given ofthe relevant properties of the 2MASS survey and the LSB galaxy selectionprocedure, as well as of basic photometric properties of the selectedobjects. The latter properties are compared to those of other samples ofgalaxies, of both LSBs and ``classical'' high surface brightness (HSB)objects, which were selected in the optical. The 2MASS LSBs have aBT_c-KT colour which is on average 0.9 mag bluerthan that of HSBs from the NGC. The 2MASS sample does not appear tocontain a significant population of red objects.All tables and Figs. 2a-c are only available in electronic form athttp://www.edpsciences.org

The Hα and Infrared Star Formation Rates for the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey
We investigate the Hα and infrared star formation rate (SFR)diagnostics for galaxies in the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey (NFGS). Forthe 81 galaxies in our sample, we derive Hα fluxes (included here)from integrated spectra. There is a strong correlation between the ratioof far-infrared to optical luminosities L(FIR)/L(Hα) and theextinction E(B-V) measured with the Balmer decrement. Before reddeningcorrection, the SFR(IR) and SFR(Hα) are related to each other by apower law: SFR(IR)=(2.7+/-0.3)SFR(Hα)1.30+/-0.06.Correction of the SFR(Hα) for extinction using the Balmerdecrement and a classical reddening curve both reduces the scatter inthe SFR(IR)-SFR(Hα) correlation and results in a much closeragreement between the two SFR indicators;SFR(IR)=(0.91+/-0.04)SFR(Hαcorr)1.07+/-0.03.SFR(IR) and SFR(Hα) agree to ~10%. This SFR relationship spans 4orders of magnitude and holds for all Hubble types with IRAS detectionsin the NFGS. A constant ratio between the SFR(IR) and SFR(Hα) forall Hubble types, including early types (S0-Sab), suggests that the IRemission in all these objects results from a young stellar population.

Mass-to-light ratios from the fundamental plane of spiral galaxy discs
The best-fitting two-dimensional plane within the three-dimensionalspace of spiral galaxy disc observables (rotational velocityvrot, central disc surface brightnessμ0=-2.5logI0 and disc scalelength h) has beenconstructed. Applying the three-dimensional bisector method ofregression analysis to a sample of ~100 spiral galaxy discs that spanmore than 4magarcsec-2 in central disc surface brightnessyields vrot\proptoI0.50\pm0.050\,h0.77\pm 0.07 (B band)and vrot\proptoI0.43\pm0.040\,h0.69\pm 0.07 (R band).Contrary to popular belief, these results suggest that in the B band,the dynamical mass-to-light ratio (within four disc scalelengths) islargely independent of the surface brightness, varying as I0.00\pm0.100\,h0.54\pm 0.14. Consistentresults were obtained when the range of the analysis was truncated byexcluding the low-surface-brightness galaxies. Previous claims thatM/LBvaries withI-1/20,Bareshown to be misleading and/or caused by galaxy selection effects - notall low-surface-brightness disc galaxies are dark matter dominated. Thesituation is, however, different in the near-infrared whereLK'~v4 and M/LK' is shown to vary asI-1/20,K\prime. Theoretical studies ofspiral galaxy discs should therefore not assume a constant M/L ratiowithin any given passband. The B-band dynamical mass-to-light ratio(within four disc scalelengths) has no obvious correlation with (B-R)disc colour, while in the K' band it varies as -1.25+/-0.28(B-R).Combining the present observational data with recent galaxy modelpredictions implies that the logarithm of the stellar-to-dynamical massratio is not a constant value, but increases as discs become redder,varying as 1.70+/-0.28(B-R).

The Westerbork HI survey of spiral and irregular galaxies. II. R-band surface photometry of late-type dwarf galaxies
R-band surface photometry is presented for 171 late-type dwarf andirregular galaxies. For a subsample of 46 galaxies B-band photometry ispresented as well. We present surface brightness profiles as well asisophotal and photometric parameters including magnitudes, diameters andcentral surface brightnesses. Absolute photometry is accurate to 0.1 magor better for 77% of the sample. For over 85% of the galaxies the radialsurface brightness profiles are consistent with published data withinthe measured photometric uncertainty. For most of the galaxies in thesample H I data have been obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis RadioTelescope. The galaxies in our sample are part of the WHISP project(Westerbork H I Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies), which aims atmapping about 500 nearby spiral and irregular galaxies in H I. Theavailability of H I data makes this data set useful for a wide range ofstudies of the structure, dark matter content and kinematics oflate-type dwarf galaxies. Based on observations made with INT operatedon the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the SpanishObservatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisicade Canarias. The tables in Appendix A are only available in electronicform at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/390/863. Thefigures in Appendix B are only available in electronic formhttp://www.edpsciences.org

An Investigation into the Prominence of Spiral Galaxy Bulges
From a diameter-limited sample of 86 low-inclination (face-on) spiralgalaxies, the bulge-to-disk size and luminosity ratios and otherquantitative measurements for the prominence of the bulge are derived.The bulge and disk parameters have been estimated using aseeing-convolved Sérsic r1/n bulge and aseeing-convolved exponential disk that were fitted to the optical (B, R,and I) and near-infrared (K) galaxy light profiles. In general,early-type spiral galaxy bulges have Sérsic values of n>1, andlate-type spiral galaxy bulges have values of n<1. In the B band,only eight galaxies have a bulge shape parameter n consistent with theexponential value 1, and only five galaxies do in the K band. Use of theexponential bulge model is shown to restrict the range ofre/h and B/D values by more than a factor of 2. Applicationof the r1/n bulge models, unlike exponential bulge models,results in a larger mean re/h ratio for the early-type spiralgalaxies than for the late-type spiral galaxies, although this result isshown not to be statistically significant. The mean B/D luminosity ratiois, however, significantly larger (>3 σ) for the early-typespirals than for the late-type spirals. Two new parameters areintroduced to measure the prominence of the bulge. The first is thedifference between the central surface brightness of the galaxy and thesurface brightness level at which the bulge and disk contribute equally.The other test uses the radius at which the contribution from the diskand bulge light are equal, normalized for the effect of intrinsicallydifferent galaxy sizes. Both of these parameters reveal that theearly-type spiral galaxies ``appear'' to have significantly (more than 2σ in all passbands) bigger and brighter bulges than late-typespiral galaxies. This apparent contradiction with the re/hvalues can be explained with an iceberg-like scenario, in which thebulges in late-type spiral galaxies are relatively submerged in theirdisk. This can be achieved by varying the relative stellar density whilemaintaining the same effective bulge-to-disk ratio. The B/D luminosityratio and the concentration index C31, in agreement with paststudies, are positively correlated and decrease as one moves along thespiral Hubble sequence toward later spiral galaxy types, although forgalaxies with large extended bulges the concentration index no longertraces the B/D luminosity ratio in a one-to-one fashion. A strong(Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient, rs=0.80) andhighly significant positive correlation exists between the shape, n, ofthe bulge light profile and the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio. Theabsolute bulge magnitude-logn diagram is used as a diagnostic tool forcomparative studies with dwarf elliptical and ordinary ellipticalgalaxies. At least in the B band these objects occupy distinctlydifferent regions of this parameter space. While the dwarf ellipticalgalaxies appear to be the faint extension to the brighter ellipticalgalaxies, the bulges of spiral galaxies do not; for a given luminositythey have a noticeably smaller shape parameter and hence a more dramaticdecline of stellar density at large radii.

Spectrophotometry of Nearby Field Galaxies: The Data
We have obtained integrated and nuclear spectra as well as U, B, Rsurface photometry for a representative sample of 196 nearby galaxies.These galaxies span the entire Hubble sequence in morphological type, aswell as a wide range of luminosities (MB=-14 to -22). Here wepresent the spectrophotometry for these galaxies. The selection of thesample and the U, B, R surface photometry is described in a companionpaper. Our goals for the project include measuring the current starformation rates and metallicities of these galaxies, and elucidatingtheir star formation histories, as a function of luminosity andmorphology. We thereby extend the work of Kennicutt to lower luminositysystems. We anticipate that our study will be useful as a benchmark forstudies of galaxies at high redshift. We describe the observing, datareduction, and calibration techniques and demonstrate that ourspectrophotometry agrees well with that of Kennicutt. The spectra spanthe range 3550-7250 Å at a resolution (FWHM) of ~6 Å andhave an overall relative spectrophotometric accuracy of ~+/-6%. Wepresent a spectrophotometric atlas of integrated and nuclear rest-framespectra as well as tables of equivalent widths and synthetic colors. Theatlas and tables of measurements will be made available electronically.We study the correlations of galaxy properties determined from thespectra and images. Our findings include: (1) galaxies of a givenmorphological class display a wide range of continuum shapes andemission-line strengths if a broad range of luminosities are considered,(2) emission-line strengths tend to increase and continua tend to getbluer as the luminosity decreases, and (3) the scatter on the generalcorrelation between nuclear and integrated Hα emission-linestrengths is large.

Surface Photometry of Nearby Field Galaxies: The Data
We have obtained integrated spectra and multifilter photometry for arepresentative sample of ~200 nearby galaxies. These galaxies span theentire Hubble sequence in morphological type, as well as a wide range ofluminosities (MB=-14 to -22) and colors (B-R=0.4-1.8). Herewe describe the sample selection criteria and the U, B, R surfacephotometry for these galaxies. The spectrophotometric results will bepresented in a companion paper. Our goals for the project includemeasuring the current star formation rates and metallicity of thesegalaxies, and elucidating their star formation histories, as a functionof luminosity and morphology. We thereby extend the work of Kennicutt tolower luminosity systems. We anticipate that our study will be useful asa benchmark for studies of galaxies at high redshift. We discuss theobserving, data reduction, and calibration techniques and show that ourphotometry agrees well with previous work in those cases in whichearlier data are available. We present an atlas of images, radialsurface brightness profiles, and color profiles as well as tables ofderived parameters. The atlas and tables of measurements will be madeavailable electronically. We study the correlations of galaxy propertiesdetermined from the galaxy images. Our findings include the following:(1) colors determined within the effective radius correlate better withmorphological type than with MB and (2) 50% of thelow-luminosity galaxies are bluest in their centers.

Arcsecond Positions of UGC Galaxies
We present accurate B1950 and J2000 positions for all confirmed galaxiesin the Uppsala General Catalog (UGC). The positions were measuredvisually from Digitized Sky Survey images with rms uncertaintiesσ<=[(1.2")2+(θ/100)2]1/2,where θ is the major-axis diameter. We compared each galaxymeasured with the original UGC description to ensure high reliability.The full position list is available in the electronic version only.

Catalogue of HI maps of galaxies. I.
A catalogue is presented of galaxies having large-scale observations inthe HI line. This catalogue collects from the literature the informationthat characterizes the observations in the 21-cm line and the way thatthese data were presented by means of maps, graphics and tables, forshowing the distribution and kinematics of the gas. It containsfurthermore a measure of the HI extension that is detected at the levelof the maximum sensitivity reached in the observations. This catalogueis intended as a guide for references on the HI maps published in theliterature from 1953 to 1995 and is the basis for the analysis of thedata presented in Paper II. The catalogue is only available inelectronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp orhttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Total magnitude, radius, colour indices, colour gradients and photometric type of galaxies
We present a catalogue of aperture photometry of galaxies, in UBVRI,assembled from three different origins: (i) an update of the catalogueof Buta et al. (1995) (ii) published photometric profiles and (iii)aperture photometry performed on CCD images. We explored different setsof growth curves to fit these data: (i) The Sersic law, (ii) The net ofgrowth curves used for the preparation of the RC3 and (iii) A linearinterpolation between the de Vaucouleurs (r(1/4) ) and exponential laws.Finally we adopted the latter solution. Fitting these growth curves, wederive (1) the total magnitude, (2) the effective radius, (3) the colourindices and (4) gradients and (5) the photometric type of 5169 galaxies.The photometric type is defined to statistically match the revisedmorphologic type and parametrizes the shape of the growth curve. It iscoded from -9, for very concentrated galaxies, to +10, for diffusegalaxies. Based in part on observations collected at the Haute-ProvenceObservatory.

Gas Mass Fractions and the Evolution of Spiral Galaxies
We show that the gas mass fraction of spiral galaxies is stronglycorrelated with luminosity and surface brightness. It is not correlatedwith linear size. Gas fraction varies with luminosity and surfacebrightness at the same rate, indicating evolution at fixed size. Dimgalaxies are clearly less evolved than bright ones, having consumed only~ \frac {1}{2} of their gas. This resolves the gas consumption paradox,since there exist many galaxies with large gas reservoirs. Thesegas-rich galaxies must have formed the bulk of their stellar populationsin the last half of a Hubble time. The existence of such immaturegalaxies at z = 0 indicates that either galaxy formation is a lengthy oreven ongoing process, or the onset of significant star formation can bedelayed for arbitrary periods in tenuous gas disks.

Near-infrared and optical broadband surface photometry of 86 face-on disk dominated galaxies. II. A two-dimensional method to determine bulge and disk parameters.
In this Paper I present a new two-dimensional decomposition technique,which models the surface photometry of a galaxy with an exponentiallight profile for both bulge and disk and, when necessary, with aFreeman bar. The new technique was tested for systematic errors on bothartificial and real data and compared with widely used one-dimensionaldecomposition techniques, where the luminosity profile of the galaxy isused. The comparisons indicate that a decomposition of thetwo-dimensional image of the galaxy with an exponential light profilefor both bulge and disk yields the most reproducible and representativebulge and disk parameters. An extensive error analysis was made todetermine the reliability of the model parameters. If the model with anexponential bulge profile is a reasonable description of a galaxy, themaximum errors in the derived model parameters are of order 20%. Theuncertainties in the model parameters will increase, if the exponentialbulge function is replaced by other often used bulge functions as the deVaucouleurs law. All decomposition methods were applied to the opticaland near-infrared data set presented by de Jong & van der Kruit(1994), which comprises 86 galaxies in six passbands.

Near-infrared and optical broadband surface photometry of 86 face-on disk dominated galaxies. IV. Using color profiles to study stellar and dust content of galaxies.
The stellar and dust content of spiral galaxies as function of radiushas been investigated using near-infrared and optical broadband surfacephotometry of 86 face-on spiral galaxies. Colors of galaxies correlatewith the azimuthally averaged local surface brightness both within andamong galaxies, with the lower surface brightness regions being bluer.The colors formed from different passband combinations correlatestrongly indicating that they probably arise from the same physicalprocess. A 3D radiative transfer model was developed to calculate theeffect of dust absorption and scattering on the luminosity and colorprofiles of galaxies. Stellar synthesis models were used to investigatethe effects of the star formation history and the metallicity on thebroadband color profiles. Combining all optical and near-infrared datashows that the color gradients in this sample of face-on galaxies arebest explained by a combined stellar age and metallicity gradient acrossthe disk, with the outer regions being on average younger and of lowermetallicity. Dust reddening probably plays only a minor role, as thedust models cannot produce reddening profiles that are compatible withthe observations. The observed color differences implicate substantialM/Llambda_ differences, both within galaxies and amonggalaxies. The variations are such that the "missing light" problemderived from rotation fitting becomes even worse. Late-type galaxies(T>=6) have lower metallicities and are often of younger average agethan earlier types and have therefore an entirely differentM/Llambda_ in most passbands. The near-infrared passbands arerecommended for studies where the M/Llambda_ ratios shouldnot vary too much.

Near-infrared and optical broadband surface photometry of 86 face-on disk dominated galaxies. III. The statistics of the disk and bulge parameters.
The statistics of the fundamental bulge and disk parameters of galaxiesand their relation to the Hubble sequence were investigated by ananalysis of optical and near-infrared observations of 86 face-on spiralgalaxies. The availability of near-infrared K passband data made itpossible for the first time to trace fundamental parameters related tothe luminous mass while hardly being hampered by the effects of dust andstellar populations. The observed number frequency of galaxies wascorrected for selection effects to calculate volume number densities ofgalaxies with respect to their fundamental parameters. The mainconclusions of this investigation are: 1) Freeman's law has to beredefined. There is no single preferred value for the central surfacebrightnesses of disks in galaxies. There is only an upper limit to thecentral surface brightnesses of disks, while for lower central surfacebrightnesses the number of galaxies per volume element decreases onlyslowly as a function of the central surface brightness. 2) The Hubblesequence type index correlates strongly with the effective surfacebrightness of the bulge, much better than with the bulge-to-disk ratio.3) The disk and bulge scalelengths are correlated. 4) These scalelengthsare not correlated with Hubble type. Hubble type is a lengthscale-freeparameter and each type therefore comes in a range of magnitudes (andpresumably a range of total masses). 5) Low surface brightness spiralgalaxies are not a separate class of galaxies. In a number of aspectsthey are a continuation of a trend defined by the high surfacebrightness galaxies. Low surface brightness galaxies are in general oflate Hubble type.

An image database. II. Catalogue between δ=-30deg and δ=70deg.
A preliminary list of 68.040 galaxies was built from extraction of35.841 digitized images of the Palomar Sky Survey (Paper I). For eachgalaxy, the basic parameters are obtained: coordinates, diameter, axisratio, total magnitude, position angle. On this preliminary list, weapply severe selection rules to get a catalog of 28.000 galaxies, wellidentified and well documented. For each parameter, a comparison is madewith standard measurements. The accuracy of the raw photometricparameters is quite good despite of the simplicity of the method.Without any local correction, the standard error on the total magnitudeis about 0.5 magnitude up to a total magnitude of B_T_=17. Significantsecondary effects are detected concerning the magnitudes: distance toplate center effect and air-mass effect.

B, V, R, I, H and K images of 86 face-on spiral galaxies
FITS images in the B, V, R, I, H and K passbands are presented of asample of 86 face-on spiral galaxies. The galaxies were selected fromthe UGC to have a diameter of at least 2 arcmin and a minor over majoraxis ratio larger than 0.625. The selected galaxies have an absoluteGalactic latitude $|b| > 25^\circ$, to minimize the effect ofGalactic extinction and foreground stars. Nearly all BVRI data wereobtained with the 1m Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope at La Palma and the H andK data were obtained at the 3.8 m UK Infra-Red Telescope at Hawaii. Thefield of view of the telescope/camera combinations were often smallerthan the observed galaxies, therefore driftscanning and mosaicingtechniques were employed to image at least along the major axis of thegalaxies. Most images were obtained during photometric nights andcalibrated using standard stars. A small fraction of the images wascalibrated from literature aperture photometry. The azimuthally averagedradial luminosity profiles derived from these galaxy images (see de Jongand van der Kruit \cite{deJ1}, Paper I) are also made available inmachine readable format, as are the results of the bulge/diskdecompositions described in de Jong (\cite{deJ2}, Paper II). A detailedstatistical analysis of the bulge and disk parameters of this data setcan be found in de Jong (\cite{deJ3}, Paper III). The dust and stellarcontent of the galaxies as derived from the color profiles is describedin de Jong (\cite{deJ4}, Paper IV). Evidence for secular evolution asfound in this sample is shown in Courteau, de Jong and Broeils(\cite{Cou96}). Courteau S., de Jong R.S., Broeils A.H., 1996, ApJLetters, 457, L73 de Jong R.S., van der Kruit P.C. 1994, A&AS 106, 451(Paper I) de Jong R.S. 1996a, A&AS 118, 557 (Paper II) de Jong R.S.1996b, A&A 313, 45 (Paper III) de Jong R.S. 1996c, A&A 313, 377 (PaperIV)

Near-infrared and optical broadband surface photometry of 86 face-on disk dominated galaxies. I. Selection, observations and data reduction.
We present accurate surface photometry in the B, V, R, I, H and Kpassbands of 86 spiral galaxies. The galaxies in this statisticallycomplete sample of undisturbed spirals were selected from the UGC tohave minimum diameters of 2' and minor over major axis ratios largerthan 0.625. This sample has been selected in such a way that it can beused to represent a volume limited sample. The observation and reductiontechniques are described in detail, especially the not often useddriftscan technique for CCDs and the relatively new techniques usingnear-infrared (near-IR) arrays. For each galaxy we present radialprofiles of surface brightness. Using these profiles we calculated theintegrated magnitudes of the galaxies in the different passbands. Weperformed internal and external consistency checks for the magnitudes aswell as the luminosity profiles. The internal consistency is well withinthe estimated errors. Comparisons with other authors indicate thatmeasurements from photographic plates can show large deviations in thezero-point magnitude. Our surface brightness profiles agree within theerrors with other CCD measurements. The comparison of integratedmagnitudes shows a large scatter, but a consistent zero-point. Thesemeasurements will be used in a series of forthcoming papers to discusscentral surface brightnesses, scalelengths, colors and color gradientsof disks of spiral galaxies.

A very large array survey of neutral hydrogen in Virgo Cluster spirals. 3: Surface density profiles of the gas
In this paper we analyze the radial profiles of the neutral hydrogensurface density distribution of 17 bright spirals in the Virgo Cluster.The profiles were derived from images, which were obtained with the VeryLarge Array (VLA) and which have been presented in a previous paper(Cayatte et al., (1990)). Although the sample is still small, we can forthe first time show, that different galaxies are affected differently bythe cluster environment. We make a quantitative estimate of theimportance of the different gas removal mechanisms for selectedindividual galaxies and compare these estimates with the observed H Imorphology. In some galaxies ram-pressure stripping has done seriousdamage to the H I disks, while in other galaxies turbulent viscousstripping and thermal conductivity have caused a mild, but global H Ideficiency across the entire disk. For our analysis we divide thegalaxies into three groups according to the ration of H I to opticaldiameter, a fourth group contains the anemic galaxies. As it turns out aclassification according to relative H I diameter helps to elucidatewhich gas removal processes play a role. Galaxies in different groupshave many other properties in common, most importantly the projecteddistance from the cluster center. A comparison of the radial H I surfacedensity profiles with those of field spirals of the same morphologicaltype shows, that spirals in different groups are affected verydifferently by the environment. Galaxies with the smallest H I sizeshave normal central surface densities and we suggest that these are thegalaxies that are currently undergoing ram-pressure sweeping. Thegalaxies with only slightly smaller than usual H I diameters have adepressed H I surface density across the entire face of the galaxy. Thisis quite likely due to viscous stripping. One group is only very mildlyaffected, this could be caused by gravitational effects due to distantencounters.

A revised catalog of CfA1 galaxy groups in the Virgo/Great Attractor flow field
A new identification of groups and clusters in the CfA1 Catalog ofHuchra et al. is presented, using a percolation algorithm to identifydensity enhancements. It is shown that in the resulting catalog,contamination by interlopers is significantly reduced. The Schechterluminosity function is redetermined, including the Malmquist bias.

Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. II - The Green Bank neutral hydrogen survey
The paper reports neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample ofdwarf and other low surface brightness galaxies. A detailed discussionand error analysis of the observations are presented, and spectra aredisplayed for 329 galaxies detected for the first time, or detected withsubstantially better signal-to-noise ratios than achieved previously.The positions on the sky of 667 galaxies meeting the present selectioncriteria north of delta = 38 deg are shown. The distribution of theredshifts of galaxies detected at Green Bank is illustrated. The GreenBank detections tapered off strongly below the median H I flux of 3.7 Jykm/s detected at Arecibo: only 12 percent of the Green Bank sample wasdetected with smaller fluxes.

The far-infrared properties of the CfA galaxy sample. I - The catalog
IRAS flux densities are presented for all galaxies in the Center forAstrophysics magnitude-limited sample (mB not greater than 14.5)detected in the IRAS Faint Source Survey (FSS), a total of 1544galaxies. The detection rate in the FSS is slightly larger than in thePSC for the long-wavelength 60- and 100-micron bands, but improves by afactor of about 3 or more for the short wavelength 12- and 25-micronbands. This optically selected sample consists of galaxies which are, onaverage, much less IR-active than galaxies in IR-selected samples. Itpossesses accurate and complete redshift, morphological, and magnitudeinformation, along with observations at other wavelengths.

The H I properties of spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster. IV - Westerbork observations of 12 field galaxies
One-dimensional H I observations of 12 spiral galaxies in a lowgalaxy-density environment have been obtained with the WesterborkSynthesis Radio Telescope. A position-velocity diagram, the H Idistribution projected upon the resolution axis of the observation, theH I global profile, and the distribution of the H I surface density aregiven for each galaxy. Most of the galaxies are found to possesssymmetrical H I distributions. For the case of UGC 7941, the H I isshown to be more asymmetrically distributed than in the average fieldgalaxy. An extended distribution of H I gas is noted in NGC 2654.

Uncertainties in 21 centimeter redshifts. I - Data
High-precision data on the 21-cm redshifts, profile widths, and shapesfor 625 galaxies are presented. Each galaxy is listed in across-identification and morphology table. High-resolution spectra arealso given for each galaxy. Internal redshift consistency is roughly 1km/s for galaxies for which the S/N is above 15. No systematic effectshave been found which might influence the observed redshift quantizationat 72.5 km/s or its submultiples.

A 21 CM survey of the Pisces-Perseus supercluster. II - The declination zone +21.5 to +27.5 degrees
Neutral-hydrogen 21-cm line spectra and derived parameters are presentedfor a sample of spiral galaxies in the region bounded by an R.A. greaterthan 22 h and less then 0.04 h, and a declination greater than +21 deg30 min and less than +27 deg 30 min, covering the Zwicky fields 470 to488, as the second installment of a survey of the region of thePisces-Perseus supercluster. New H I line observations made with theArecibo 305 m telescope detected 275 galaxies of 318 studied. Atabulation of derived galaxian properties is given. The redshiftdistribution shows gross departures from that expected for a sample withsimilar magnitude characteristics but homogeneously located in space.These new data will be incorporated into the overall survey of thethree-dimensional structure in the Pisces-Perseus region.

Analysis of groups of galaxies with accurate redshifts
Arecibo radio telescope redshift measurements have been obtained forover 100 galaxies in more than 40 different groups which generallyconsist of a large spiral galaxy with one or more companions. This setof data is supplemented with over 160 galaxies in more than 40 groupswhose dominant galaxy is brighter than 11.8 mag. An analysis of theentire sample indicates that typical structure in extragalactic space isone in which a large central galaxy has smaller and fainter companionsextending from about 20-900 kpc around. The companion galaxies in thesegroups have significantly higher redshifts than the brightest galaxy inthe group, confirming previous studies in whose results the companiongalaxies are systematically redshifted with respect to the dominantgalaxy.

A survey of galaxy redshifts. IV - The data
The complete list of the best available radial velocities for the 2401galaxies in the merged Zwicky-Nilson catalog brighter than 14.5mz and with b (II) above +40 deg or below -30 deg ispresented. Almost 60 percent of the redshifts are from the CfA surveyand are accurate to typically 35 km/s.

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Right ascension:02h03m37.60s
Aparent dimensions:2.692′ × 1.862′

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