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Gas and Stars in an H I-Selected Galaxy Sample
We present the results of a J-band study of the H I-selected AreciboDual-Beam Survey and Arecibo Slice Survey galaxy samples using TwoMicron All Sky Survey data. We find that these galaxies span a widerange of stellar and gas properties. However, despite the diversitywithin the samples, we find a very tight correlation between luminosityand size in the J band, similar to that found in a previous paper byRosenberg & Schneider between the H I mass and size. We also findthat the correlation between the baryonic mass and the J-band diameteris even tighter than that between the baryonic mass and the rotationalvelocity.

The Properties of Satellite Galaxies in External Systems. I. Morphology and Structural Parameters
We present the first results of an ongoing project to study themorphological, kinematical, dynamical, and chemical properties ofsatellite galaxies of external giant spiral galaxies. The sample ofobjects has been selected from the catalog by Zaritsky et al. The paperanalyzes the morphology and structural parameters of a subsample of 60such objects. The satellites span a great variety of morphologies andsurface brightness profiles. About two-thirds of the sample are spiralsand irregulars, the remaining third being early-types. Some casesshowing interaction between pairs of satellites are presented andbriefly discussed.

The Arecibo Dual-Beam Survey: Arecibo and VLA Observations
The Arecibo Dual-Beam Survey is a ``blind'' 21 cm search for galaxiescovering ~430 deg2 of sky. We present the data from thedetection survey as well as from the follow-up observations to confirmdetections and improve positions and flux measurements. We find 265galaxies, many of which are extremely low surface brightness. Some ofthese previously uncataloged galaxies lie within the zone of avoidance,where they are obscured by the gas and dust in our Galaxy. Eighty-one ofthese sources are not previously cataloged optically, and there are 11galaxies that have no associated optical counterpart or are onlytentatively associated with faint wisps of nebulosity on the DigitizedSky Survey images. We discuss the properties of the survey, and inparticular we make direct determinations of the completeness andreliability of the sample. The behavior of the completeness and itsdependencies is essential for determining the H I mass function. Weleave the discussion of the mass function for a later paper, but do notethat we find many low surface brightness galaxies and seven sources withMHI<108 Msolar. The AreciboObservatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center,which is operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement withthe National Science Foundation. in Puerto Rico.

Nearby Optical Galaxies: Selection of the Sample and Identification of Groups
In this paper we describe the Nearby Optical Galaxy (NOG) sample, whichis a complete, distance-limited (cz<=6000 km s-1) andmagnitude-limited (B<=14) sample of ~7000 optical galaxies. Thesample covers 2/3 (8.27 sr) of the sky (|b|>20deg) andappears to have a good completeness in redshift (97%). We select thesample on the basis of homogenized corrected total blue magnitudes inorder to minimize systematic effects in galaxy sampling. We identify thegroups in this sample by means of both the hierarchical and thepercolation ``friends-of-friends'' methods. The resulting catalogs ofloose groups appear to be similar and are among the largest catalogs ofgroups currently available. Most of the NOG galaxies (~60%) are found tobe members of galaxy pairs (~580 pairs for a total of ~15% of objects)or groups with at least three members (~500 groups for a total of ~45%of objects). About 40% of galaxies are left ungrouped (field galaxies).We illustrate the main features of the NOG galaxy distribution. Comparedto previous optical and IRAS galaxy samples, the NOG provides a densersampling of the galaxy distribution in the nearby universe. Given itslarge sky coverage, the identification of groups, and its high-densitysampling, the NOG is suited to the analysis of the galaxy density fieldof the nearby universe, especially on small scales.

Box- and peanut-shaped bulges. I. Statistics
We present a classification for bulges of a complete sample of ~ 1350edge-on disk galaxies derived from the RC3 (Third Reference Catalogue ofBright Galaxies, de Vaucouleurs et al. \cite{rc3}). A visualclassification of the bulges using the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) inthree types of b/p bulges or as an elliptical type is presented andsupported by CCD images. NIR observations reveal that dust extinctiondoes almost not influence the shape of bulges. There is no substantialdifference between the shape of bulges in the optical and in the NIR.Our analysis reveals that 45% of all bulges are box- and peanut-shaped(b/p). The frequency of b/p bulges for all morphological types from S0to Sd is > 40%. In particular, this is for the first time that such alarge frequency of b/p bulges is reported for galaxies as late as Sd.The fraction of the observed b/p bulges is large enough to explain theb/p bulges by bars. Partly based on observations collected at ESO/LaSilla (Chile), DSAZ/Calar Alto (Spain), and Lowell Observatory/Flagstaff(AZ/U.S.A.). Tables 6 and 7 are only available in electronic form at CDSvia anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Box- and peanut-shaped bulges. II. NIR observations
We have observed 60 edge-on galaxies in the NIR in order to study thestellar distribution in galaxies with box/peanut-shaped bulges. The muchsmaller amount of dust extinction at these wavelengths allows us toidentify in almost all target galaxies with box/peanut-shaped bulges anadditional thin, central component in cuts parallel to the major axis.This structure can be identified with a bar. The length of thisstructure scaled by the length of the bulge correlates with themorphologically classified shape of the bulge. This newly establishedcorrelation is therefore mainly interpreted as the projection of the barat different aspect angles. Galaxies with peanut bulges have a bar seennearly edge-on and the ratio of bar length to thickness, 14 +/- 4, canbe directly measured for the first time. In addition, the correlation ofthe boxiness of bulges with the bar strength indicates that the barcharacteristic could partly explain differences in the bulge shape.Furthermore, a new size relation between the box/peanut structure andthe central bulge is found. Our observations are discussed in comparisonto a N-body simulation for barred galaxies (Pfenniger & Friedli\cite{pfe}). We conclude that the inner region of barred disk galaxiesare build up by three distinct components: the spheroidal bulge, a thinbar, and a b/p structure most likely representing the thick part of thebar. Based on observations collected at ESO/La Silla (61.A-0143),DSAZ/Calar Alto, and TIRGO/Gornergrat.}

Arcsecond Positions of UGC Galaxies
We present accurate B1950 and J2000 positions for all confirmed galaxiesin the Uppsala General Catalog (UGC). The positions were measuredvisually from Digitized Sky Survey images with rms uncertaintiesσ<=[(1.2")2+(θ/100)2]1/2,where θ is the major-axis diameter. We compared each galaxymeasured with the original UGC description to ensure high reliability.The full position list is available in the electronic version only.

The I-Band Tully-Fisher Relation for SC Galaxies: 21 Centimeter H I Line Data
A compilation of 21 cm line spectral parameters specifically designedfor application of the Tully-Fisher (TF) distance method is presentedfor 1201 spiral galaxies, primarily field Sc galaxies, for which opticalI-band photometric imaging is also available. New H I line spectra havebeen obtained for 881 galaxies. For an additional 320 galaxies, spectraavailable in a digital archive have been reexamined to allow applicationof a single algorithm for the derivation of the TF velocity widthparameter. A velocity width algorithm is used that provides a robustmeasurement of rotational velocity and permits an estimate of the erroron that width taking into account the effects of instrumental broadeningand signal-to-noise. The digital data are used to establish regressionrelations between measurements of velocity widths using other commonprescriptions so that comparable widths can be derived throughconversion of values published in the literature. The uniform H I linewidths presented here provide the rotational velocity measurement to beused in deriving peculiar velocities via the TF method.

The I-Band Tully-Fisher Relation for SC Galaxies: Optical Imaging Data
Properties derived from the analysis of photometric I-band imagingobservations are presented for 1727 inclined spiral galaxies, mostly oftypes Sbc and Sc. The reduction, parameter extraction, and errorestimation procedures are discussed in detail. The asymptotic behaviorof the magnitude curve of growth and the radial variation in ellipticityand position angle are used in combination with the linearity of thesurface brightness falloff to fit the disk portion of the profile. TotalI-band magnitudes are calculated by extrapolating the detected surfacebrightness profile to a radius of eight disk scale lengths. Errors inthe magnitudes, typically ~0.04 mag, are dominated by uncertainties inthe sky subtraction and disk-fitting procedures. Comparison is made withthe similar imaging database of Mathewson, Ford, & Buchhorn, both aspresented originally by those authors and after reanalyzing theirdigital reduction files using identical disk-fitting procedures. Directcomparison is made of profile details for 292 galaxies observed incommon. Although some differences occur, good agreement is found,proving that the two data sets can be used in combination with onlyminor accommodation of those differences. The compilation of opticalproperties presented here is optimized for use in applications of theTully-Fisher relation as a secondary distance indicator in studies ofthe local peculiar velocity field.

More Satellites of Spiral Galaxies
We present a revised and expanded catalog of satellite galaxies of a setof isolated spiral galaxies similar in luminosity to the Milky Way. Thissample of 115 satellites, 69 of which were discovered in our multifiberredshift survey, is used to probe the results obtained from the originalsample further (Zaritsky et al.). The satellites are, by definition, atprojected separations <~500 kpc, have absolute recessional velocitydifferences with respect to the parent spiral of less than 500 km s-1,and are at least 2.2 mag fainter than their associated primary galaxy. Akey characteristic of this survey is the strict isolation of thesesystems, which simplifies any dynamical analysis. We find no evidencefor a decrease in the velocity dispersion of the satellite system as afunction of radius out to galactocentric radii of 400 kpc, whichsuggests that the halo extends well beyond 200 kpc. Furthermore, the newsample affirms our previous conclusions (Zaritsky et al.) that (1) thevelocity difference between a satellite and its primary is not stronglycorrelated with the rotation speed of the primary, (2) the system ofsatellites has a slight net rotation (34 +/- 14 km s-1) in the samesense as the primary's disk, and (3) that the halo mass of an ~L* spiralgalaxy is in excess of 2 x 1012 Mȯ.

Optical Rotation Curves and Linewidths for Tully-Fisher Applications
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1997AJ....114.2402C&db_key=AST

Deep r-Band Photometry for Northern Spiral Galaxies
We present r-band surface photometry for 349 northern Sb-Sc UGCgalaxies, from a total of 627 CCD images. For each galaxy, we presentsurface brightness profiles, isophotal and total magnitudes, isophotalradii, and structural parameters from exponential fits to the disk. Onehundred ninety-five galaxies have been observed more than once. Allnights with a photometric transformation scatter greater than 0.022 magwere rejected. Sky errors are investigated carefully and yield profilesthat are reliable down to 26 r mag arcsec^-2^, Deep isophotal magnitudesare as accurate as +/-0.019, and extrapolated magnitudes are internallyconsistent to within 0.020. We compare visual (UGC) and CCD isophotaldiameters and show that axial ratio must be included as a thirdparameter. Comparison with the r-band CCD photometry of Kent andWillick, and accounting for sky errors, suggest typical errors for totalmagnitudes of +/-0.08. Our data are also shown to be zero-pointed on thesame Gunn r system as that of Kent and Willick. Ellipticity measurementsagree very well except for progressively face-on galaxies where spiralstructure is more conspicuous. The ellipticity internal error is lessthan 0.02, or about 3^deg^ for inclinations. Our internal extinctioncorrection implies that disks are semitransparent in their outer parts.We caution that comparison of central surface brightnesses and scalelengths is complicated by the subjective nature of their measurement;extreme care must be applied when using such quantities. We measure anapparent Freeman law of (μ_0,c_) = 20.08 +/- 0.55 r mag arcsec^-2^.This magnitude-limited sample was originally derived for studies oflarge-scale motions in the local universe. The deep CCD photometry isalso ideally suited for matching spectroscopic studies, mass modeling,galaxy structural analysis, etc.

On the question of radio emission of spiral galaxies in groups of galaxies
It has been shown that the radio emission properties of spiral galaxies,if the other conditions are the same, are determined rather by thepresence of the close neighbours than by space density of galaxiesaround them. The rate of occurence of radio sources and their radioluminosities among the spiral members of groups of galaxies depend onthe projected seperation between them and their nearest neighbour. Theshorter this seperation the higher the probability of radio emission.

An image database. II. Catalogue between δ=-30deg and δ=70deg.
A preliminary list of 68.040 galaxies was built from extraction of35.841 digitized images of the Palomar Sky Survey (Paper I). For eachgalaxy, the basic parameters are obtained: coordinates, diameter, axisratio, total magnitude, position angle. On this preliminary list, weapply severe selection rules to get a catalog of 28.000 galaxies, wellidentified and well documented. For each parameter, a comparison is madewith standard measurements. The accuracy of the raw photometricparameters is quite good despite of the simplicity of the method.Without any local correction, the standard error on the total magnitudeis about 0.5 magnitude up to a total magnitude of B_T_=17. Significantsecondary effects are detected concerning the magnitudes: distance toplate center effect and air-mass effect.

Large-Scale Structures in the Zone of Avoidance: The Galactic Anticenter Region
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1995ApJ...449..527L&db_key=AST

The extended 12 micron galaxy sample
We have selected an all-sky (absolute value of b greater than or equalto 25 deg) 12 micron flux-limited sample of 893 galaxies from the IRASFaint Source Catalog, Version 2 (FSC-2). We have obtained accurate totalfluxes in the IRAS wavebands by using the ADDSCAN procedure for allobjects with FSC-2 12 micron fluxes greater than 0.15 Jy and increasingflux densities from 12 to 60 microns, and defined the sample by imposinga survey limit of 0.22 Jy on the total 12 micron flux. Its completenessis verified, by means of the classical log N - log S andV/Vmax tests, down to 0.30 Jy, below which we have measuredthe incompleteness down to the survey limit, using the log N - log Splot, for our statistical analysis. We have obtained redshifts (mostlyfrom catalogs) for virtually all (98.4%) the galaxies in the sample.Using existing catalogs of active galaxies, we defined a subsample of118 objects consisting of 53 Seyfert 1s and quasars, 63 Seyfert 2s, andtwo blazars (approximately 13% of the full sample), which is the largestunbiased sample of Seyfert galaxies ever assembled. Since the 12 micronflux has been shown to be about one-fifth of the bolometric flux forSeyfert galaxies and quasars, the subsample of Seyferts (includingquasars and blazars) is complete not only to 0.30 Jy at 12 microns butalso with respect to a bolometric flux limit of approximately 2.0 x10-10 ergs/s/sq cm. The average value of V/Vmaxfor the full sample, corrected for incompleteness at low fluxes, is 0.51+/- 0.04, expected for a complete sample of uniformly distributedgalaxies, while the value for the Seyfert galaxy subsample is 0.46 +/-0.10. We have derived 12 microns and far-infrared luminosity functionsfor the AGNs, as well as for the entire sample. We extracted from oursample a complete subsample of 235 galaxies flux-limited (8.3 Jy) at 60microns. The 60 micron luminosity function computed for this subsampleis in satisfactory agreement with the ones derived from the brightgalaxy sample (BGS) and the deep high-galactic latitude sample, bothselected at 60 microns.

A revised catalog of CfA1 galaxy groups in the Virgo/Great Attractor flow field
A new identification of groups and clusters in the CfA1 Catalog ofHuchra et al. is presented, using a percolation algorithm to identifydensity enhancements. It is shown that in the resulting catalog,contamination by interlopers is significantly reduced. The Schechterluminosity function is redetermined, including the Malmquist bias.

Dynamics of Binary Galaxies. I. Wide Pairs
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1993ApJ...419...30C&db_key=AST

Satellites of spiral galaxies
We present a survey of satellites around a homogeneous set of late-typespirals with luminosity similar to that of the Milky Way. On average, wefind fewer than 1.5 satellites per primary, but we argue that we cantreat the survey as an ensemble and so derive the properties of the haloof a 'typical' isolated spiral. The projected density profile of theensemble falls off approximately as 1/r. Within 50 kpc the azimuthaldistribution of satellites shows some evidence for the 'Holmbergeffect', an excess near the minor axis of the primary; however, atlarger projected distances, the distribution appears isotropic. There isa weak but significant correlation between the size of a satellite andits distance from its primary, as expected if satellites are tidallytruncated. Neither Hubble type nor spectral characteristics correlatewith apparent separation. The ensemble of satellites appears to berotating at about 30 km/s in the same direction as the galactic disk.Satellites on prograde orbits tend to be brighter than those onretrograde orbits. The typical velocity difference between a satelliteand its primary shows no clear dependence either on apparent separation,or on the rotation speed of the primary. Thus our survey demonstratesthat isolated spiral galaxies have massive halos that extend to manyoptical radii.

General study of group membership. II - Determination of nearby groups
We present a whole sky catalog of nearby groups of galaxies taken fromthe Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database. From the 78,000 objects in thedatabase, we extracted a sample of 6392 galaxies, complete up to thelimiting apparent magnitude B0 = 14.0. Moreover, in order to considersolely the galaxies of the local universe, all the selected galaxieshave a known recession velocity smaller than 5500 km/s. Two methods wereused in group construction: a Huchra-Geller (1982) derived percolationmethod and a Tully (1980) derived hierarchical method. Each method gaveus one catalog. These were then compared and synthesized to obtain asingle catalog containing the most reliable groups. There are 485 groupsof a least three members in the final catalog.

A survey of small-scale extremes in extinction at low Galactic latitudes using IRAS galaxies
Optical CCD and 21 cm H I data are combined here via the Tully-Fisherrelation to study the Galactic extinction in the V an I bands over anangular scale of a few arcmin at absolute Galactic latitudes between 2and 16 deg. Extinctions in V and I bands are found to be linearlycorrelated with A(I) about 0.58 A(V), with no noticeable environmentaldependence and consistent with existing results of Galactic reddening.There is a large scatter in the simple linear relation with csc /b/,confirming the existence of 'holes' and patches at low Galacticlatitudes. The mean correlation between Galactic extinction and H Icolumn density over a comparable angular scale is also found to beconsistent with those at high latitudes over large angular scales.Correlation is also found between optical extinction and the IRAS 100micron sky brightness, and this sky brightness is only slightly worsethan H I column density as an indicator for optical extinction.

The far-infrared properties of the CfA galaxy sample. I - The catalog
IRAS flux densities are presented for all galaxies in the Center forAstrophysics magnitude-limited sample (mB not greater than 14.5)detected in the IRAS Faint Source Survey (FSS), a total of 1544galaxies. The detection rate in the FSS is slightly larger than in thePSC for the long-wavelength 60- and 100-micron bands, but improves by afactor of about 3 or more for the short wavelength 12- and 25-micronbands. This optically selected sample consists of galaxies which are, onaverage, much less IR-active than galaxies in IR-selected samples. Itpossesses accurate and complete redshift, morphological, and magnitudeinformation, along with observations at other wavelengths.

Structure of superclusters and supercluster formation. V - Spatial correlation and voids
The galaxian spatial correlation function is calculated for variousobservational samples having different sample volume. It is demonstratedthat the correlation length increases with sample volume. For volumesconsiderably smaller than the size of the Local Supercluster thecorrelation length is about half the conventional value, 5/h Mpc, whichcorresponds to sizes of intermediate samples, containing the wholesupercluster. Samples containing several superclusters have correlationlengths twice the conventional one. Similar calculations have beencarried out for various theoretical models. Samples representingluminous matter in a neutrino-dominated universe and having differentsample volumes have correlation length which increases with volume untilthe sample size reaches the average size of voids. Further increase inthe sample size does not change the correlation length, indicating thatfair samples of the model universe have been reached. These calculationsand simple theoretical estimates indicate that the value of thecorrelation length reflects the filling factor of the sample and thepresence of large voids in galaxy distribution. The observed correlationfunction of galaxies reflects the distribution of luminous matter. Aftercorrecting for the difference between the correlation functions of truemass and galaxies, the correlation length for a fair sample of theuniverse is estimated to be 10/h Mpc.

High signal-to-noise ratio observations of H I in 243 galaxies
The 21 cm spectral-line system of the Arecibo Observatory was used tomeasure neutral hydrogen emission from 243 faint galaxies. Most lie nearthe plane of the Local Supercluster. All observations reach anunsmoothed signal-to-noise ratio of at least 7.0; the average for theset is 23. The resulting data are used to estimate H I masses, systemicvelocities, and accurate profile widths at 20 percent, 25 percent, 50percent, and 80 percent of peak intensity levels. The widths are used tocalibrate directly the bias introduced by popular data-smoothingoperation. The data include observations of 65 objects with previouslyunknown redshifts.

A search for environmental effects on the optical properties of galaxies in groups
Environmental density-related modifications of basic optical properties(luminosities, sizes, axial ratios, and colors) of galaxies belonging toGeller and Huchra's (1983) groups have been investigated. Remarkably, itis found that the broad maxima of the distributions of luminosities anddiameters of spirals and the whole corresponding distributions oflenticulars tend to move to lower values as one goes to groups of highcompactness, whereas the luminosity-diameter relationship of spiralstends to become flatter. No color and axial ratio differences betweengalaxies of high- and low-compactness groups have been detected.

An observational study of the dynamics of binary galaxies
The single velocity measurement rms error value in the present set ofradial velocities for all galaxies in the Turner (1976) catalog of 156binary systems is estimated t be 29 km/sec. Typical velocity differencesare very small, with half of the 55 systems in the subsample of isolatedspiral-spiral pairs (the most reliable set of 'pure' binaries) havingmeasured velocity differences of less than 75 km/sec. By means of MonteCarlo simulations of scale-free ensembles of binary galaxies, it ispossible to show that the present data's independence of eitherluminosity or projected separation is inconsistent both with thehypothesis that the mass of binary systems increases linearly withluminosity, and that galaxies in pairs may effectively be treated aspoint masses. The data favor models in which galaxies interact through aquasi-isothermal potential only weakly depending on luminosity.

A survey of galaxy redshifts. IV - The data
The complete list of the best available radial velocities for the 2401galaxies in the merged Zwicky-Nilson catalog brighter than 14.5mz and with b (II) above +40 deg or below -30 deg ispresented. Almost 60 percent of the redshifts are from the CfA surveyand are accurate to typically 35 km/s.

Binary galaxie. I. A well-defined statistical sample.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1976ApJ...208...20T&db_key=AST

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Observation and Astrometry data

Right ascension:09h38m07.90s
Aparent dimensions:2.239′ × 0.776′

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NGC 2000.0NGC 2939

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