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Massive star formation in the central regions of spiral galaxies
Context: . The morphology of massive star formation in the centralregions of galaxies is an important tracer of the dynamical processesthat govern the evolution of disk, bulge, and nuclear activity. Aims. Wepresent optical imaging of the central regions of a sample of 73 spiralgalaxies in the Hα line and in optical broad bands, and deriveinformation on the morphology of massive star formation. Methods. Weobtained images with the William Herschel Telescope, mostly at a spatialresolution of below one second of arc. For most galaxies, no Hαimaging is available in the literature. We outline the observing anddata reduction procedures, list basic properties, and present the I-bandand continuum-subtracted Hα images. We classify the morphology ofthe nuclear and circumnuclear Hα emission and explore trends withhost galaxy parameters. Results. We confirm that late-type galaxies havea patchy circumnuclear appearance in Hα, and that nuclear ringsoccur primarily in spiral types Sa-Sbc. We identify a number ofpreviously unknown nuclear rings, and confirm that nuclear rings arepredominantly hosted by barred galaxies. Conclusions. Other than instimulating nuclear rings, bars do not influence the relative strengthof the nuclear Hα peak, nor the circumnuclear Hα morphology.Even considering that our selection criteria led to an over-abundance ofgalaxies with close massive companions, we do not find any significantinfluence of the presence or absence of a close companion on therelative strength of the nuclear Hα peak, nor on the Hαmorphology around the nucleus.

Multicolor Surface Photometry of Lenticular Galaxies. I. The Data
We present multicolor surface and aperture photometry in the B, V, R,and K' bands for a sample of 34 lenticular galaxies from the UppsalaGeneral Catalogue. From surface photometric analysis, we obtain radialprofiles of surface brightness, colors, ellipticity, position angle, andthe Fourier coefficients that describe the departure of isophotal shapesfrom a purely elliptical form; we find the presence of dust lanes,patches, and ringlike structure in several galaxies in the sample. Weobtain total integrated magnitudes and colors and find that these are ingood agreement with the values from the Third Reference Catalogue.Isophotal colors are correlated with each other, following the sequenceexpected for early-type galaxies. The color gradients in lenticulargalaxies are more negative than the corresponding gradients inelliptical galaxies. There is a good correlation between B-V and B-Rcolor gradients, and the mean gradients in the B-V, B-R, and V-K' colorsare -0.13+/-0.06, -0.18+/-0.06, and -0.25+/-0.11 mag dex-1 inradius, respectively.

Properties of isolated disk galaxies
We present a new sample of northern isolated galaxies, which are definedby the physical criterion that they were not affected by other galaxiesin their evolution during the last few Gyr. To find them we used thelogarithmic ratio, f, between inner and tidal forces acting upon thecandidate galaxy by a possible perturber. The analysis of thedistribution of the f-values for the galaxies in the Coma cluster leadus to adopt the criterion f ≤ -4.5 for isolated galaxies. Thecandidates were chosen from the CfA catalog of galaxies within thevolume defined by cz ≤5000 km s-1, galactic latitudehigher than 40o and declination ≥-2.5o. Theselection of the sample, based on redshift values (when available),magnitudes and sizes of the candidate galaxies and possible perturberspresent in the same field is discussed. The final list of selectedisolated galaxies includes 203 objects from the initial 1706. The listcontains only truly isolated galaxies in the sense defined, but it is byno means complete, since all the galaxies with possible companions underthe f-criterion but with unknown redshift were discarded. We alsoselected a sample of perturbed galaxies comprised of all the diskgalaxies from the initial list with companions (with known redshift)satisfying f ≥ -2 and \Delta(cz) ≤500 km s-1; a totalof 130 objects. The statistical comparison of both samples showssignificant differences in morphology, sizes, masses, luminosities andcolor indices. Confirming previous results, we found that late spiral,Sc-type galaxies are, in particular, more frequent among isolatedgalaxies, whereas Lenticular galaxies are more abundant among perturbedgalaxies. Isolated systems appear to be smaller, less luminous and bluerthan interacting objects. We also found that bars are twice as frequentamong perturbed galaxies compared to isolated galaxies, in particularfor early Spirals and Lenticulars. The perturbed galaxies have higherLFIR/LB and Mmol/LB ratios,but the atomic gas content is similar for the two samples. The analysisof the luminosity-size and mass-luminosity relations shows similartrends for both families, the main difference being the almost totalabsence of big, bright and massive galaxies among the family of isolatedsystems, together with the almost total absence of small, faint and lowmass galaxies among the perturbed systems. All these aspects indicatethat the evolution induced by interactions with neighbors would proceedfrom late, small, faint and low mass Spirals to earlier, bigger, moreluminous and more massive spiral and lenticular galaxies, producing atthe same time a larger fraction of barred galaxies but preserving thesame relations between global parameters. The properties we found forour sample of isolated galaxies appear similar to those of high redshiftgalaxies, suggesting that the present-day isolated galaxies could bequietly evolved, unused building blocks surviving in low densityenvironments.Tables \ref{t1} and \ref{t2} are only available in electronic form athttp://www.edpsciences.org

The Hα galaxy survey. I. The galaxy sample, Hα narrow-band observations and star formation parameters for 334 galaxies
We discuss the selection and observations of a large sample of nearbygalaxies, which we are using to quantify the star formation activity inthe local Universe. The sample consists of 334 galaxies across allHubble types from S0/a to Im and with recession velocities of between 0and 3000 km s-1. The basic data for each galaxy are narrowband H\alpha +[NII] and R-band imaging, from which we derive starformation rates, H\alpha +[NII] equivalent widths and surfacebrightnesses, and R-band total magnitudes. A strong correlation is foundbetween total star formation rate and Hubble type, with the strongeststar formation in isolated galaxies occurring in Sc and Sbc types. Moresurprisingly, no significant trend is found between H\alpha +[NII]equivalent width and galaxy R-band luminosity. More detailed analyses ofthe data set presented here will be described in subsequent papers.Based on observations made with the Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope operatedon the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the SpanishObservatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto deAstrofísica de Canarias.The full version of Table \ref{tab3} is available in electronic form atthe CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/414/23 Reduced image datafor this survey can be downloaded fromhttp://www.astro.livjm.ac.uk/HaGS/

A new catalogue of ISM content of normal galaxies
We have compiled a catalogue of the gas content for a sample of 1916galaxies, considered to be a fair representation of ``normality''. Thedefinition of a ``normal'' galaxy adopted in this work implies that wehave purposely excluded from the catalogue galaxies having distortedmorphology (such as interaction bridges, tails or lopsidedness) and/orany signature of peculiar kinematics (such as polar rings,counterrotating disks or other decoupled components). In contrast, wehave included systems hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) in thecatalogue. This catalogue revises previous compendia on the ISM contentof galaxies published by \citet{bregman} and \citet{casoli}, andcompiles data available in the literature from several small samples ofgalaxies. Masses for warm dust, atomic and molecular gas, as well asX-ray luminosities have been converted to a uniform distance scale takenfrom the Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC). We have used twodifferent normalization factors to explore the variation of the gascontent along the Hubble sequence: the blue luminosity (LB)and the square of linear diameter (D225). Ourcatalogue significantly improves the statistics of previous referencecatalogues and can be used in future studies to define a template ISMcontent for ``normal'' galaxies along the Hubble sequence. The cataloguecan be accessed on-line and is also available at the Centre desDonnées Stellaires (CDS).The catalogue is available in electronic form athttp://dipastro.pd.astro.it/galletta/ismcat and at the CDS via anonymousftp to\ cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( or via\http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/405/5

Bar Galaxies and Their Environments
The prints of the Palomar Sky Survey, luminosity classifications, andradial velocities were used to assign all northern Shapley-Ames galaxiesto either (1) field, (2) group, or (3) cluster environments. Thisinformation for 930 galaxies shows no evidence for a dependence of barfrequency on galaxy environment. This suggests that the formation of abar in a disk galaxy is mainly determined by the properties of theparent galaxy, rather than by the characteristics of its environment.

Nearby Optical Galaxies: Selection of the Sample and Identification of Groups
In this paper we describe the Nearby Optical Galaxy (NOG) sample, whichis a complete, distance-limited (cz<=6000 km s-1) andmagnitude-limited (B<=14) sample of ~7000 optical galaxies. Thesample covers 2/3 (8.27 sr) of the sky (|b|>20deg) andappears to have a good completeness in redshift (97%). We select thesample on the basis of homogenized corrected total blue magnitudes inorder to minimize systematic effects in galaxy sampling. We identify thegroups in this sample by means of both the hierarchical and thepercolation ``friends-of-friends'' methods. The resulting catalogs ofloose groups appear to be similar and are among the largest catalogs ofgroups currently available. Most of the NOG galaxies (~60%) are found tobe members of galaxy pairs (~580 pairs for a total of ~15% of objects)or groups with at least three members (~500 groups for a total of ~45%of objects). About 40% of galaxies are left ungrouped (field galaxies).We illustrate the main features of the NOG galaxy distribution. Comparedto previous optical and IRAS galaxy samples, the NOG provides a densersampling of the galaxy distribution in the nearby universe. Given itslarge sky coverage, the identification of groups, and its high-densitysampling, the NOG is suited to the analysis of the galaxy density fieldof the nearby universe, especially on small scales.

Arcsecond Positions of UGC Galaxies
We present accurate B1950 and J2000 positions for all confirmed galaxiesin the Uppsala General Catalog (UGC). The positions were measuredvisually from Digitized Sky Survey images with rms uncertaintiesσ<=[(1.2")2+(θ/100)2]1/2,where θ is the major-axis diameter. We compared each galaxymeasured with the original UGC description to ensure high reliability.The full position list is available in the electronic version only.

Galaxy coordinates. II. Accurate equatorial coordinates for 17298 galaxies
Using images of the Digitized Sky Survey we measured coodinates for17298 galaxies having poorly defined coordinates. As a control, wemeasured with the same method 1522 galaxies having accurate coordinates.The comparison with our own measurements shows that the accuracy of themethod is about 6 arcsec on each axis (RA and DEC).

Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameters
We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 diskgalaxies brighter than B_T = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogueof Galaxies that are confined within a volume located in the outer partof the Local Supercluster. With our earlier published I-band CCD andhigh signal-to-noise ratio 21 cm H I data, this paper completes ouroptical surface photometry campaign on this galaxy sample. As anapplication of this data set, the B-band photometry is used here toillustrate two selection effects that have been somewhat overlooked inthe literature but that may be important in deriving the distributionfunction of disk central surface brightness (CSB) of disk galaxies froma diameter- and/or flux-limited sample: a Malmquist-type bias againstdisk galaxies with small disk scale lengths (DSLs) at a given CSB and adisk inclination-dependent selection effect that may, for example, biastoward inclined disks near the threshold of a diameter-limited selectionif disks are not completely opaque in the optical. Taking intoconsideration these selection effects, we present a method ofconstructing a volume-sampling function and a way to interpret thederived distribution function of CSB and DSL. Application of this methodto our galaxy sample implies that if galaxy disks are optically thin,CSB and DSL may well be correlated in the sense that, up to aninclination-corrected limiting CSB of about 24.5 mag arcsec^-2 that isadequately probed by our galaxy sample, the DSL distribution of galaxieswith a lower CSB may have a longer tail toward large values unless thedistribution of disk galaxies as a function of CSB rises rapidly towardfaint values.

Bulge-Disk Decomposition of 659 Spiral and Lenticular Galaxy Brightness Profiles
We present one of the largest homogeneous sets of spiral and lenticulargalaxy brightness profile decompositions completed to date. The 659galaxies in our sample have been fitted with a de Vaucouleurs law forthe bulge component and an inner-truncated exponential for the diskcomponent. Of the 659 galaxies in the sample, 620 were successfullyfitted with the chosen fitting functions. The fits are generally welldefined, with more than 90% having rms deviations from the observedprofile of less than 0.35 mag. We find no correlations of fittingquality, as measured by these rms residuals, with either morphologicaltype or inclination. Similarly, the estimated errors of the fittedcoefficients show no significant trends with type or inclination. Thesedecompositions form a useful basis for the study of the lightdistributions of spiral and lenticular galaxies. The object base issufficiently large that well-defined samples of galaxies can be selectedfrom it.

A catalogue of Mg_2 indices of galaxies and globular clusters
We present a catalogue of published absorption-line Mg_2 indices ofgalaxies and globular clusters. The catalogue is maintained up-to-datein the HYPERCAT database. The measurements are listed together with thereferences to the articles where the data were published. A codeddescription of the observations is provided. The catalogue gathers 3541measurements for 1491 objects (galaxies or globular clusters) from 55datasets. Compiled raw data for 1060 galaxies are zero-point correctedand transformed to a homogeneous system. Tables 1, 3, and 4 areavailable in electronic form only at the CDS, Strasbourg, via anonymousftp Table 2 is available both in text and electronic form.

Total magnitude, radius, colour indices, colour gradients and photometric type of galaxies
We present a catalogue of aperture photometry of galaxies, in UBVRI,assembled from three different origins: (i) an update of the catalogueof Buta et al. (1995) (ii) published photometric profiles and (iii)aperture photometry performed on CCD images. We explored different setsof growth curves to fit these data: (i) The Sersic law, (ii) The net ofgrowth curves used for the preparation of the RC3 and (iii) A linearinterpolation between the de Vaucouleurs (r(1/4) ) and exponential laws.Finally we adopted the latter solution. Fitting these growth curves, wederive (1) the total magnitude, (2) the effective radius, (3) the colourindices and (4) gradients and (5) the photometric type of 5169 galaxies.The photometric type is defined to statistically match the revisedmorphologic type and parametrizes the shape of the growth curve. It iscoded from -9, for very concentrated galaxies, to +10, for diffusegalaxies. Based in part on observations collected at the Haute-ProvenceObservatory.

A catalogue of spatially resolved kinematics of galaxies: Bibliography
We present a catalogue of galaxies for which spatially resolved data ontheir internal kinematics have been published; there is no a priorirestriction regarding their morphological type. The catalogue lists thereferences to the articles where the data are published, as well as acoded description of these data: observed emission or absorption lines,velocity or velocity dispersion, radial profile or 2D field, positionangle. Tables 1, 2, and 3 are proposed in electronic form only, and areavailable from the CDS, via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (to130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Molecular Gas, Morphology, and Seyfert Galaxy Activity
We probe the cause of the elevated star formation in host galaxies ofSeyfert 2 nuclei compared with Seyfert 1 hosts and with field galaxies.12CO (1--0) observations of a large sample of Seyfert galaxies indicateno significant difference in the total amount of molecular gas as afunction of the Seyfert nuclear type, nor are Seyfert galaxiessignificantly different in this regard from a sample of field galaxiesonce selection effects are accounted for. Therefore, the total amount ofmolecular gas is not responsible for the enhanced star-forming activityin Seyfert 2 hosts. To probe how this gas is being converted moreefficiently into stars in Seyfert 2 hosts than in the other galaxies, weinvestigate the occurrence of bars, interactions, and distortedmorphologies among Seyfert galaxies. We find a significantly higher rateof asymmetric morphologies for Seyfert 2 galaxies with respect toSeyfert 1 galaxies and field galaxies. Relative to field galaxies, theeffect is at a greater than 99.9% confidence level. The presence ofasymmetric morphologies in individual Seyfert galaxies is correlatedwith their tendency to exhibit enhanced star-forming activity. Theseresults suggest that asymmetric morphologies are an important cause forthe link between Seyfert type and star-forming activity: bars anddistortions in Seyfert 2 hosts are likely both to enhance star-formingactivity and to funnel gas into the nuclear region, thus obscuring andpossibly contributing to the feeding of the active nucleus.

A Survey of Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies to Detect H i--rich Companions
We have conducted a survey for H I-rich companions in the vicinity oflow surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies, objects that arecharacterized by low rates of massive star formation. This surveycomplements our earlier survey of dwarf galaxies exhibiting high starformation rates (H II galaxies). Four of the 17 LSB dwarfs in the samplehave nearby, H I-rich companions, and a total of five companions weredetected. The companion frequency is therefore ρ = 0.24, and wedetermine a lower limit on the true rate of 0.08. This is a much lowerrate of occurrence than was detected around the H II galaxies, ρ =0.57, which implies a lower limit of ρ > 0.37. Because the twosurveys were carried out under nearly identical circumstances, thisdifference is genuine and not the result of any relative bias betweenthe two samples. That H II galaxies have companions more than twice asoften as LSB dwarfs provides evidence that the bursts of massive starformation in H II galaxies are being triggered by galaxy-galaxyinteractions.

An image database. II. Catalogue between δ=-30deg and δ=70deg.
A preliminary list of 68.040 galaxies was built from extraction of35.841 digitized images of the Palomar Sky Survey (Paper I). For eachgalaxy, the basic parameters are obtained: coordinates, diameter, axisratio, total magnitude, position angle. On this preliminary list, weapply severe selection rules to get a catalog of 28.000 galaxies, wellidentified and well documented. For each parameter, a comparison is madewith standard measurements. The accuracy of the raw photometricparameters is quite good despite of the simplicity of the method.Without any local correction, the standard error on the total magnitudeis about 0.5 magnitude up to a total magnitude of B_T_=17. Significantsecondary effects are detected concerning the magnitudes: distance toplate center effect and air-mass effect.

Integrated photoelectric magnitudes and color indices of bright galaxies in the Johnson UBV system
The photoelectric total magnitudes and color indices published in theThird Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies (RC3) are based on ananalysis of approximately equals 26,000 B, 25,000 B-V, and 17,000 U-Bmultiaperture measurements available up to mid 1987 from nearly 350sources. This paper provides the full details of the analysis andestimates of internal and external errors in the parameters. Thederivation of the parameters is based on techniques described by theVaucouleurs & Corwin (1977) whereby photoelectric multiaperture dataare fitted by mean Hubble-type-dependent curves which describe theintegral of the B-band flux and the typical B-V and U-B integrated colorgradients. A sophisticated analysis of the residuals of thesemeasurements from the curves was made to allow for the random andsystematic errors that effect such data. The result is a homogeneous setof total magnitudes BTA total colors(B-V)T and (U-B)T, and effective colors(B-V)e and (U-B)e for more than 3000 brightgalaxies in RC3.

Radio Continuum Observations of Starburst Galaxies
We present radio continuum observations with the VLA at 3.6 and 6 cm andwith MERLIN at 18 cm of a sample of mildly active galaxies, includingthe archetypal starburst galaxies NGC 1808 and 253, both of which have alarge number of compact radio components. These observations were madeto estimate the spectral indices and brightness temperatures of thesefeatures, which could help to clarify the nature of the radio emission.The spectral indices of all the prominent compact components in NGC1808, and of the five outside the central plateau of emission in NGC253, are consistent with them being supernova remnants. We discuss someof the properties of these compact radio components and the possiblesupernova rate in their parent galaxies. We also report the results ofour search for compact radio components in the remaining sources of oursample.

Measuring the Hubble constant and our Virgo-infall velocity independently
A sample of spiral galaxies with BT less than 14.5 located intwo local volumes, one in the direction of, but behind, the VirgoCluster (behind-Virgo volume (BV)) and the other in the oppositedirection (anti-Virgo volume (AV)), were used via a Tully-Fisher (TF)relation to derive the following two parameters: HAB, themean Hubble ratio between AV and BV, and delta vparallel, thepeculiar velocity of the Local Group in the direction of the VirgoCluster (VC) with respect to a uniformly expanding reference systemdefined by our AV and BV sub-samples. The two sampled volumes, separatedby a velocity interval of 5600 km/s, form an antipodal pair. Thisparticular geometry not only allows us to derive the two parametersindependently but also reduces the dynamical effect of the LocalSupercluster on HAB without increasing the Malmquist bias. Bylimiting our sample to spiral galaxies having large velocity widthsWR, we effectively reduce the TF scatter and Malmquist biasin our sample. The TF zero point and dispersion were then determined byfurther correcting for the small residual Malmquist bias. An additionalsample of fainter galaxies was used to test for a non-Gaussian tail tothe TF disperison. We found no evidence for such a tail and formallygive an upper limit of about 18% for the fractional contribution of anunseen tail. The average intrinsic TF dispersion for the dominantGaussian component is sigmaTF0 approximately 0.33mag for WR approximately equal to or greater than 180 km/s.Our numerical results are delta vparallel approximatelyequals 414 +/- 82 km/s and HAB approximately equals (84.0 +/-2.4)(1 + epsilon) km/s Mpc, where (1 + epsilon) accounts for anysystematic error between the calibrators and the sample galaxies.Various dynamical models were tested to explore the effect onHAB of the uncertainties in the local velocity field.Constrained by our observed delta vparallel as well as otherobservational quantities, we found that the rms deviation from unity ofHAB/H0 (where H0 is the Hubble constantfor each model) is 5%, making HAB a good indicator forH0. Taking this variation as an additional error, our formalestimate for the Hubble constant is H0 approximately equals(84 +/- 5)(1 + epsilon) km/s Mpc.

H I 21 centimeter observations and I-band CCD surface photometry of spiral galaxies behind the Virgo Cluster and toward its antipode
Sample selection, radio and optical data acquisition and reduction, andobservation results are presented for spiral galaxies behind the VirgoCluster and toward its antipode. I-band CCD photometry was obtained forall the bright galaxies and part of the sample of faint galaxies in thetwo local volumes was studied. The statistical properties of the galaxysamples are discussed.

Star formation in the disks of H I-rich S0 galaxies
We present the results of a H-alpha emission-line imaging survey of asample of neutral-gas-rich S galaxies. We find evidence of disk H IIregions in 14 of our sample of 32 galaxies, detect nuclear or faintdiffuse circumnuclear H-alpha + forbidden N II emission in another 11galaxies without disk H II regions, and obtain upper limits for 8galaxies. We find a striking dichotomy between Ss with and without H IIregions; either a galaxy has a number of H II regions, most oftendistributed into distinct rings or ringlike structures, or there arenone down to detection limits equivalent to a single unreddened H IIregion ionized by single O stars. We find that the S0s without disk H IIregions have a lower median MH I/L(B) than those with disk HII regions, but the distributions have a large range of dispersion. Ourdata suggest that S0s may lie in a regime where local threshold effects,perhaps primarily kinematic in origin, are more important in determiningthe star formation in these galaxies than the global stabilitymechanisms that recent empirical models for large-scale star formationhave suggested prevail in later-type spirals.

The small scale environment of low surface brightness disk galaxies
We use a sample of about 340 low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxieswith measured redshifts in combination with the Center for Astrophysicsredshift survey to test the hypothesis that LSB galaxies have a deficitof nearby companion galaxies compared to high surface brightness (HSB)disk galaxies. We find a very strong statistical deficit of galaxieslocated within a projected radius of 0.5 Mpc and within a velocity of500 km/s around LSB disk galaxies compared to HSB ones. Further,comparing LSB and HSB disk galaxies which are located in the sameportion of the sky indicates that the average distance to the nearestneighbor is 1.7 times farther for LSB disk galaxies. AKomologorov-Smirnoff test rules out, at greater than the 99 percentconfidence level, the hypothesis that the distribution ofnearest-neighbor distances is the same for HSB and LSB disk galaxies. Wespeculate that LSB disk galaxies have relatively long formation timescales and therefore must form in relative isolation. In addition, thelack of tidal interactions over a Hubble time serves to suppress theoverall star-formation rate as no external trigger is available to helpclump the gas. The observed low surface densities of H I in combinationwith the low probability of tidal interactions effectively preventsthese disk galaxies from evolving very rapidly.

A survey of the Pisces-Perseus supercluster. VI - The declination zone +15.5 deg to 21.5 deg
New results are presented of Arecibo observations in the 21 cm line of765 galaxies with declinations between 15.5 deg and 21.5 deg, in thePisces-Perseus supercluster zone. If considered independently on theneighboring parts of sky, this region, to the South of the superclusterridge, shows significantly less evidence of structure on large scales inexcess of 30 Mpc, contrasting substantially with the characteristics ofthe declination zones immediately to the North.

The far-infrared properties of the CfA galaxy sample. I - The catalog
IRAS flux densities are presented for all galaxies in the Center forAstrophysics magnitude-limited sample (mB not greater than 14.5)detected in the IRAS Faint Source Survey (FSS), a total of 1544galaxies. The detection rate in the FSS is slightly larger than in thePSC for the long-wavelength 60- and 100-micron bands, but improves by afactor of about 3 or more for the short wavelength 12- and 25-micronbands. This optically selected sample consists of galaxies which are, onaverage, much less IR-active than galaxies in IR-selected samples. Itpossesses accurate and complete redshift, morphological, and magnitudeinformation, along with observations at other wavelengths.

H I content and FIR emission of S0 galaxies
A sample of 252 S0 galaxies is used to study the relationship between HI content and far-IR emission. Logarithms of the H I content versus thefar-IR emission are employed statistically to develop a best-fit linearregression line which is compared to a slope of approximately unity. Theslopes are different for S0 and SB0 galaxies versus S0/a and SB0/agalaxies. The distribution of the 60-100 micron flux ratio is notsignificantly affected by the presence or absence of bars nor by thedifferences between the S0 and S0/a systems. The flux ratio is higherthan the critical value of Helou in 34 percent of the cases, and thevalue holds when nuclear emission is taken into account. In cases wherethe critical value is exceeded, most far-IR emissions are expected to bedue to star formation. S0 galaxies are generally found to have a normalISM, except where the systems have accreted their H I gas. Systems withdisproportionate FIR emission can be considered galaxies that areexperiencing enhanced star formation or that have had their H I gasswept away.

H II Regions in so Galaxies; Clues to the Origin of the ISM in Sos
Not Available

The Southern Supercluster
The Southern Supercluster is described using data compiled from fivecatalogs, reduced to a homogeneous system following RC2. In terms ofmass, luminosity, and mass-to-light ratio, the Southern Superclustercompares well with the Coma and Hercules superclusters, but is lessmassive than the Local Supercluster. It is shown that, even though theSouthern Supercluster is the nearest supercluster to the LocalSupercluster, it is well separated from the Local Supercluster. However,there is evidence of a tenuous stream of galaxies connecting theSouthern Supercluster with the Perseus Supercluster.

Star-forming regions in gas-rich lenticulars. I - H-alpha imaging of an initial sample of galaxies
The first results of an H-alpha imaging survey of H I rich S0 and S0/agalaxies are presented. Analysis of CCD H-alpha interference-filterimages of 16 galaxies is reported. Eight of these galaxies show evidencefor ongoing star formation, one has nuclear emission but no H IIregions, and the remaining seven have no emission detected withwell-defined upper limits. A few of the galaxies with H II regionsexhibit global peculiarities, while the others have essentially normalappearances. In the peculiar galaxies, the emission from H II regionsappears pervasive, while in the apparently normal galaxies the H IIregions are either organized into inner-disk rings or randomlydistributed throughout the disk. A few of the galaxies are found to beclearly not S0s, or peculiar objects atypical of the S0 class. Usingsimple models, star-formation rates are derived from the observedH-alpha fluxes, and an estimate of gas-depletion time scales is made.

The H I content of lenticular and early-type galaxies - A comparison between field and Virgo cluster samples
A very simple method to take into account the upper limits of detectionis used to study and discuss the distribution of the H I contents of 122lenticular galaxies. The results show the Virgo cluster S0s to be H Ideficient when compared to the noncluster ones, and the H I contents ofthe latter to be about five times lower than the ones of the S0/aspirals and to increase along the de Vaucouleurs sequence of types -3 to-1. It is shown that the early spirals in Virgo are H I-deficient by afactor higher than 10, i.e., they have no more gas than noncluster S0s.It is argued that noncluster S0s have a primordial origin, and that asubstantial proportion of Virgo S0s come from stripped early spirals.

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Right ascension:01h19m55.00s
Aparent dimensions:1.862′ × 1.072′

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NGC 2000.0NGC 473

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