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The IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample
IRAS flux densities, redshifts, and infrared luminosities are reportedfor all sources identified in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample(RBGS), a complete flux-limited survey of all extragalactic objects withtotal 60 μm flux density greater than 5.24 Jy, covering the entiresky surveyed by IRAS at Galactic latitudes |b|>5°. The RBGS includes629 objects, with median and mean sample redshifts of 0.0082 and 0.0126,respectively, and a maximum redshift of 0.0876. The RBGS supersedes theprevious two-part IRAS Bright Galaxy Samples(BGS1+BGS2), which were compiled before the final(Pass 3) calibration of the IRAS Level 1 Archive in 1990 May. The RBGSalso makes use of more accurate and consistent automated methods tomeasure the flux of objects with extended emission. The RBGS contains 39objects that were not present in the BGS1+BGS2,and 28 objects from the BGS1+BGS2 have beendropped from RBGS because their revised 60 μm flux densities are notgreater than 5.24 Jy. Comparison of revised flux measurements forsources in both surveys shows that most flux differences are in therange ~5%-25%, although some faint sources at 12 and 25 μm differ byas much as a factor of 2. Basic properties of the RBGS sources aresummarized, including estimated total infrared luminosities, as well asupdates to cross identifications with sources from optical galaxycatalogs established using the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Inaddition, an atlas of images from the Digitized Sky Survey with overlaysof the IRAS position uncertainty ellipse and annotated scale bars isprovided for ease in visualizing the optical morphology in context withthe angular and metric size of each object. The revised bolometricinfrared luminosity function, φ(Lir), forinfrared-bright galaxies in the local universe remains best fit by adouble power law, φ(L)~Lα, withα=-0.6(+/-0.1) and α=-2.2(+/-0.1) below and above the``characteristic'' infrared luminosityL*ir~1010.5Lsolar,respectively. A companion paper provides IRAS High Resolution (HIRES)processing of over 100 RBGS sources where improved spatial resolutionoften provides better IRAS source positions or allows for deconvolutionof close galaxy pairs.

Lopsided Spiral Galaxies and a Limit on the Galaxy Accretion Rate
We present a measurement of lopsidedness for the stellar disks of 60field spiral galaxies in terms of the azimuthal m = 1 Fourier amplitude,A1, of the stellar light. We confirm the previous result (Rix &Zaritsky) that ~30% of field spiral galaxies in a magnitude-limitedsample exhibit significant lopsidedness ( >= 0.2) atlarge radii (R > 1.5 disk scalelengths). We conjecture that thislopsidedness is caused by tidal interactions and calculate an upperlimit on the accretion rate of small galaxies. We exploit thecorrelation between lopsidedness and photometric measures of recent starformation (Zaritsky) to obtain two independent estimates of the lifetimeof these m = 1 distortions. First, we show that lopsided galaxies havean excess of blue luminosity relative to that of symmetric galaxies withthe same H I linewidth, which we attribute to a recent star formationepisode that was triggered by an interaction between the galaxy and acompanion. We use stellar population models (Bruzual & Charlot) toestimate the time since that interaction. Second, we use the N-bodysimulation of an infalling satellite by Walker, Mihos, & Hernquistto estimate how fast tidally induced m = 1 distortions are erasedthrough phase mixing. Both approaches indicate that the observations areconsistent with a hypothesized tidal interaction that occurred about 1Gyr ago for galaxies that are lopsided at the 20% level. By combiningthis lifetime estimate for lopsidedness, the observed frequency of suchdistortions, and a correction to the survey volume that depends on theincrease in luminosity during an interaction, we derive an upper limiton the current companion accretion rate of field spiral galaxies (forcompanion masses ~10% parent galaxy mass) that lies in the range0.07--0.25 Gyr-1. The principal uncertainty in this limit arises fromambiguities in the interpretation of the correlation betweenlopsidedness and MB.

A 1.425 GHz Atlas of the IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample, Part II
Galaxies with δ >= -45^deg^ and |b| >= 10^deg^ in the IRASBright Galaxy Sample, Part II, were observed at 1.425 GHz by the VeryLarge Array in its B, CnB, C, DnC, and D configurations. An atlas ofradio contour maps and a table listing the principal radio sourceparameters (position, flux density, angular size) are given. This atlasof 187 galaxies supplements the 1.49 GHz atlas of 313 galaxies in therevised Bright Galaxy Sample, Part I. Together, they are complete forextragalactic sources stronger than S = 5.24Jy at λ = 60 micronsin the area |b| > 10^deg^, δ > -45^deg^. To the extent thatthe far-infrared and radio brightness distributions overlap, these radiomaps provide the most accurate positions and high-resolution images ofthe brightest extragalactic far-infrared sources.

The IRAS Bright Galaxy Survey - Part II: Extension to Southern Declinations (delta ~< -30), and Low Galactic Latitudes (f<|b|
Complete IRAS Observations and redshifts are reported for all sourcesidentified in the IRAS Bright Galaxy Survey-Part II (hereafter referredto as BGS_2_). Source positions, radial velocities, optical magnitudes,and total flux densities, peak flux densities, and spatial extents at12, 25, and 100 ,microns are reported for 288 sources having 60 micronflux densities > 5.24 Jy, the completeness limit of the originalBright Galaxy Survey [Soifer et al., AJ, 98,766(1989)], hereafterreferred to as BGS_1_. These new data represent the extension of theIRAS Bright Galaxy Survey to southern declinations,δ<~-30^deg^, and low Galactic latitudes,5^deg^<|b|<30^deg^. Although the sky coverage of the BGS_2_ (~19935 deg^2^) is 37% larger than the sky coverage of the BGS_1_, thenumber of sources is 8% smaller due primarily to large scale structurein the local distribution of galaxies. Otherwise, the sources in theBGS_2_ show similar relationships between number counts and flux densityas observed for the 313 sources in the BGS_1_. The BGS_2_ along with theearlier BGS, represents the best sample currently available for definingthe infrared properties of galaxies in the local (z <~ 0.1) Universe.

A volume-limited sample of IRAS galaxies to 4000 km/s, 3: CCD photometry from Palomar and Tololo observatories
An all-sky, quasi-volume-limited sample of 251 spiral galaxies within4000 km/s has been extracted from the redshift survey of InfraredAstronomy Satellite (IRAS) galaxies by Strauss (1992). Distance modulifor these objects estimated via the Tully-Fisher (TF) method allow thepeculiar velocity field and the cosmological density parameter to beconstrained within this volume. The TF relation we exploit relatesdeprojected neutral hydrogen line width to near-infrared luminosity.Herein we present I and V band photometry for 159 members of this sampleobtained with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at Palomar and Tololoobservatories. Image processing and photometric calibration proceduresare described. Twenty seven objects with multiple calibratedobservations suggest that isophotal I band magnitudes are reproduced toequal to or less than 0.05 mag precision at sigmaI = 23.5 magarcsec-2, and that systematic run-to-run offsets are limitedto equal to or less than 0.05 I mag.

A volume-limited sample of IRAS galaxies to 4000 km/s, 2: Neutral hydrogen observations from the Parkes telescope
We have extracted a volume-limited sample of spiral galaxies within 4000km/s from the Strauss et al. (1992) redshift survey of InfraredAstronomical Satellite (IRAS) galaxies. The purpose of the sample is touse distances obtained from the neutral hydrogen/near-infrared (I-band)Tully-Fisher relation to study deviations from uniform Hubble expansion.This will allow us to estimate the distribution of mass in the localuniverse and to place constraints on the value of the cosmologicaldensity parameter, omega 0. Here we report neutral hydrogen(H I) observations of 61 galaxies from this sample taken at the 64 mParkes telescope, 48 of which resulted in measured linewidth parameters.Empirical estimates of random and systematic errors in H I line widthsat low signal-to-noise ratio are described.

The QMW IRAS galaxy catalogue - A highly complete and reliable IRAS 60-micron galaxy catalogue
This study presents a highly complete and reliable IRAS 60-micron galaxycatalog covering 82 percent of the sky. IRAS color conditions are usedto exclude galactic sources, including the remaining cirrus sources. Allsources flagged as extended, confused, or having a poor correlationcoefficient with a point-source template are examined with the raw IRASdata and accurate fluxes determined using mapping routines. Thecompleteness, reliability, and flux accuracy of the catalog arediscussed. Identifications are made with existing optical galaxycatalogs and with galaxy redshift surveys in the literature. It isestimated that redshifts are available for 79 percent of the galaxies inthe catalog with V less than 5000 km/s, and the 3D distribution of suchgalaxies is displayed. The dipole component of the surface-brightnessdistribution of galaxies in the catalog is discussed.

Models for infrared emission from IRAS galaxies
The far-infrared spectra of galaxies detected in four wavelength bandsby IRAS have been modeled in terms of a cool disk component, a warmerstarburst component, and a Seyfert component peaking at 25 microns.Although the models are found to fit the observed spectra of non-Seyfertand several Seyfert galaxies, a more complex geometry for the dustdistribution is indicated for NGC 1068 and many other Seyfert galaxies.In some cases, the dust in the narrow-line region has a nonsphericallysymmetric geometry.

Southern Galaxy Catalogue.
Not Available

Identification of infrared sources in the IRAS circulars
From IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite) Circulars Nos. 4 to 15, 110infrared sources have been identified. Out of these 110 identifiedsources 99 are galaxies, nine are nebulae, one is a dark object, and oneis a non-stellar object. Thirty-five of these galaxies, have alreadybeen studied, mostly are spiral type. The characteristics of sixty-fourremaining galaxies, for which the type is not known or uncertain, arestudied by comparing their colors and luminosities with known galaxies.The galaxies observed by IRAS are mostly active galaxies.

The Antlia cluster of galaxies and its environment - The Hydra I-Centaurus supercluster
The small Antlia cluster of galaxies was investigated by measuring manyradial velocities for galaxies from the Lauberts catalog in the Antliaregion. Apart from the Antlia cluster itself, four more small groupswere identified. These five systems form a tiny but not bound Antliamini-supercluster. The mini-supercluster consists of small groups andclusters and of a dispersed component of field galaxies. The five galaxysystems are also part of the large Hydra I-Centaurus supercluster. Thislarge supercluster belongs now to the class of well observed ones. Ithas a chain-like filamentary structure. This supercluster seems to beconnected to the Local Supercluster via two very extended but very loosegroups. The total structure is the triangle-shaped Virgo-HydraI-Centaurus supercluster.

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Observation and Astrometry data

Right ascension:10h31m35.50s
Aparent dimensions:1.38′ × 0.977′

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names   (Edit)
NGC 2000.0NGC 3278

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